American Indian

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Related to Amerindian: Amerindian language, Amerindian music

American Indian

1. a member of any of the indigenous peoples of North, Central, or South America, having Mongoloid affinities, notably straight black hair and a yellow to brown skin
2. of or relating to any of these peoples, their languages, or their cultures
References in periodicals archive ?
As a Member of Parliament, he was keen on establishing land rights for Amerindians. Among his greatest achievements was the move towards crafting the Amerindian Act and to develop better health facilities, a postal service and agriculture in the North West District.
The six chapters of Part I, Pre-American Theories of Reincarnation, deal with Amerindian, Greek, Roman, Neoplatonic, Medieval Christian, Kabbalistic, and Christian esoteric ideas about rebirth.
Traces of an Amerindian presence at the Red Bay whaling station are concentrated on the northern shore of Saddle Island (Logan and Tuck, 1990: 7).
A 2016 study by the Indigenous advocacy organization Amerindian Peoples Association Guyana (apa) found that the Guyanese government had granted mining and logging concessions on large swaths of the Amerindian's tided lands as well as their customary hunting and foraging lands--often without free, prior, and informed consent from them, as is required by international law.
Yagi employs the term Amerindian throughout the work.
In the light of this discussion, which addresses Marc Brightman, Carlos Fausto and Vanessa Grotti's recent anthology on Amerindian forms of ownership, Pedro de Niemeyer Cesarino's study among the Marubo, and Eduardo Viveiros de Castro's observations about poeisis (production) and praxis (action) in Indigenous Amazonia, my goal is to facilitate and refine the conversation between literary theory and Amerindian poetics.
Amerindian complaints about the destructive nature of uncontrolled forest harvesting were documented from 1815 onwards and may have been directed primarily at the selective felling of purpleheart (Peltogyne venosa) and crabwood (Carapa guianensis) trees (Menezes 1988, 355).
Given the depth of current scholarship on theories about the Gift, bartering, and commodity transactions, it is difficult to accept the claim, for example, that "in the Amerindian societies of the Guianas ...
If the author was Amerindian, the text was considered questionable.
It appears with high frequency among Amerindian and Eskimo, as well as Japanese and Chinese, populations (Krauss et al., 1969; Bailit; Palomino et al.).
My journey was beyond the lodge, beyond the Rewa Amerindian village, where permits to fish the area are issued and up to and beyond Corona falls.
Knowing the day, Knowing the World: Engaging Amerindian thought in Public Archaeology by Lesley Green and David R.