American Indian

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Related to Amerindian: Amerindian language, Amerindian music

American Indian

1. a member of any of the indigenous peoples of North, Central, or South America, having Mongoloid affinities, notably straight black hair and a yellow to brown skin
2. of or relating to any of these peoples, their languages, or their cultures
References in periodicals archive ?
Numerous Amerindian groups call this land home, including the Makushi, Wapishana, Waiwai, and Patamona peoples.
In the light of this discussion, which addresses Marc Brightman, Carlos Fausto and Vanessa Grotti's recent anthology on Amerindian forms of ownership, Pedro de Niemeyer Cesarino's study among the Marubo, and Eduardo Viveiros de Castro's observations about poeisis (production) and praxis (action) in Indigenous Amazonia, my goal is to facilitate and refine the conversation between literary theory and Amerindian poetics.
The Government of Guyana has set the policy objective of addressing all Land Titling issues by 2015, for Amerindian villages where two thirds of the adult population request this to be done based on the principles of free, prior and informed consent.
Given the depth of current scholarship on theories about the Gift, bartering, and commodity transactions, it is difficult to accept the claim, for example, that "in the Amerindian societies of the Guianas .
If the author was an Iberian friar, the text was usually approved as legitimate--despite the fact that Amerindians had an important role in the translation of all the theological material and that in some cases friars left the work to Amerindian Christians.
In Guyana, the arapaima is legally protected against hunting and harvesting by the government, the local Rewa Amerindian tribe and operators.
Based on more than a decade of research in Palikur lands known as Arukwa in the state of Amapa, Brazil, Knowing the Day, Knowing the World reconsiders the dialogue between formal scholarship and Amerindian ways of knowing.
George Berkeley hatched a plan to build a theological school for formally training Amerindian evangelists in the 1720s that never came to fruition, even after the idea resurfaced two decades later in the Barbados Codrington College effort designed to train slave preachers.
Beginning with their rise to preeminence, Gwynne describes how in the early eighteenth century they invaded from the north to displace or destroy competing Amerindian peoples while stymieing the expansion of the Spanish Empire.
Persaud said that since the mining operation was being done on privately owned Amerindian lands in the village, the GGMC had no direct responsibility in terms of dictating the types of operation, nor was it in a position to grant permission to mine.
Amerindian Elements in the Poetry of Ernesto Cardenal: Mythic Foundations of the Colloquial Narrative.