Amhara

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Amhara

1. a region of NW Ethiopia: formerly a kingdom
2. an inhabitant of the former kingdom of Amhara

Amhara

 

the largest ethnic group in Ethiopia. The Amhara live primarily in the central and northern regions of the country—the provinces of Shoa, Gojjam, and Bagēmder—and also the provinces of Wallo, Arusi, Kaffa, Walagā, Harar, and Sidamo. They speak Amharic. Their numbers have been estimated at 6–7 to 10–11 million people. (More precise calculations are difficult, since today many other peoples speak Amharic.) The Amharas are Monoph-ysitie Christians. (Christianity entered Ethiopia as early as the fourth century A.D.) Their main occupation is farming (maize, sorghum, and legumes); some raise cattle.

REFERENCES

Narody Afriki. Moscow, 1954.
Rait, M. V. Narody Efiopii. Moscow, 1965.
Ullendorff, E. The Ethiopians. London, 1960.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the ethnic hierarchy of Ethiopian society, assimilated Oromo were positioned lower than the Amhara but higher than the unassimilated Oromo.
However, the Amhara rulers, who themselves have not known similar subjugation, were insensitive to the feelings and aspirations of the Oromo.
However, as Balsvik has correctly observed, the students, and Amhara students in particular, supported the government policy of linguistic and cultural assimilation.
Thus despite the rhetoric of revolution the Ethiopian state was not ready to re-define itself, change its Amhara identity for a multi-cultural and multi-national one.
Up to June 1991, the Ethiopian state was dominated by the Amhara.
76) The use of the Latin alphabet in Oromo writing has become a cause for a vehement campaign particularly from the clergy of the Orthodox Church and the Amhara elites.
the Amhara, the rejection of the Amharic culture by die Oromos, the disappearance
Irrespective of the open opposition from both the Amhara elite and covert suppression by the Tigrean elite who rule Ethiopia today, the trend in the development of the Oromo language, which is now underway, is not easy to reverse.
For a discussion of the predominance of linguistic concerns over religious ideology in the opposition of Amhara priests and officials to the Oromo Bible and the evangelical movement in Wallaga, see Bulcha, 'The Language Policies of Ethiopian regimes', pp.
While she advocated the assimilation of the Oromo into the Amhara state, she also commented: `The provisions in the United Nations Charter for the direction of international interest upon the conditions of the backward people who have been annexed to the empires of foreign rulers, which have been willingly accepted by Great Britain, would seem to apply with complete propriety to the regions and people conquered by Menelik'.
When I was in school, we had in grade six, an Amhara (from a naftanya background) who taught us science.
The lack of objection to Amharization revealed in this comment was probably quite common, especially among Amhara students, before the level of consciousness about the ethnic issue prevented such comments from appearing in student papers.