Amici prism


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Amici prism

[ə′mēch·ē ‚priz·əm]
(optics)
A compound prism, used in direct-vision spectroscopes, that disperses a beam of light into a spectrum without causing the beam as a whole to undergo any net deviation; it is made up of alternate crown and flint glass components, refracting in opposite directions. Also known as direct-vision prism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even at full zoom, its 12.5[degrees] field is still a lot wider than the 1[degrees] field of a typical low-power eyepiece, and Hunter soon realized the biggest hiccup in his design: With the focal plane inside the Amici prism, he couldn't add cross-hairs to indicate the center of his finder's field.
Perhaps the best solution is to buy a diagonal made with an Amici prism, which employs two reflections instead of an ordinary diagonal's one.
Unless it has very large errors, a single Amici prism will not by itself introduce image rotation--a significant advantage over normal multiprism binocular designs.
The design I settled upon consists of a pair of small telescopes equipped with Amici prisms to provide a correct, non-inverted view.
A big Amici prism from a World War II Navy MK-47 gunsight has 1.32-inch faces, allowing me to use an eyepiece with a 13/16-inch field stop, The prism's bronze cell was fitted with a custom-made helical focuser and silver-brazed to the back of the finder.
Or use an Amici prism, which employs two reflections instead of an ordinary diagonal's one.