Amicitia

Amicitia

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Amicitia, asteroid 367 (the 367th asteroid to be discovered, on May 19, 1893), is approximately 20 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 3.3 years. Its name is a personified form of the Latin word for friendship. When prominent in a natal chart, Amicitia indicates a friendly personality. The sign and house position indicate both how one interacts with friends and what one’s friends are like.

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.
The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Tiberius in a letter to him saith, Haec pro amicitia nostra non occultavi; and the whole senate dedicated an altar to Friendship, as to a goddess, in respect of the great dearness of friendship, between them two.
(8.) Throughout the Middle Ages, the major classical theories of friendship from Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics (books 8 and 9) and Cicero's De amicitia were well known (Ullrich Langer, Perfect Friendship: Studies in Literature and Moral Philosophy from Boccaccio to Corneille [Geneva: Librairie Droz, 1994], 20-26).
Montaigne begins the essay with a meditation on friendship (drawing on the Greek and Roman concepts of philia and amicitia).
In a dramatic environment in which no other social bonds seem to operate, he believes in a voluntary social group bound by philia or amicitia, the classical ideal of friendship.
Derrida's book relies heavily not only on basic classical sources of the discussion of friendship in politics, Aristotle's Eudemian Ethics [19] and Nichomachean Ethics, [20] but also on Cicero's Laelius de Amicitia. [21] In each of these classic sources, friendship is seen as a fundamental public virtue, as something that transcends both religion and citizenship and as a core value that enables the household and peer group to relate to the republic.
Amicitia Carnalis: the "Friendship" of Troilus and Pandarus in Troilus and Criscyde.
"From Academia to Amicitia: Milton's Latin Writings and the Italian Academies." Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, 88.6 (1998).
Thomas's use of amicitia as the natural analogate for caritas (Summa Theologiae II-II, 23, 1).
The permissible ideal of male intimacy (amicitia) was epitomized by Christ and Saint John the Evangelist, "the beloved disciple' who were paired in manuscript illuminations by the 12th century and became popular in German sculpture after 1300.
This was followed in 1481 by an edition of William Worcester's translation of Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia (on Old Age and Friendship) and Tiptoft's translation of The Declamation of Noblesse.
Beeson, `The "lost" manuscript of Cicero's De Amicitia', CP 21 (1926), 120-32.