ammonium sulfide

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ammonium sulfide

[ə′mōn·yəm ′səl‚fīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
(NH4)2S Yellow crystals, stable only when dry and below 0°C; decomposes on melting; soluble in water and alcohol; used in photographic developers and for coloring brasses and bronzes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Below this outer cloud layer sits a layer of solid ammonium hydrosulfide particles.
In many respects, Saturn's atmosphere is similar in structure and composition to Jupiter's, with a deck of water clouds at the bottom, ammonium hydrosulfide (N[H.sub.4]SH) clouds in the middle, and a deck of frozen ammonia (N[H.sub.3]) clouds at the top--the one we see--discolored by traces of nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorous compounds.
The key finding: cloud particles at the top of the great storm are composed of a mix of three substances: water ice, ammonia ice, and an uncertain third constituent that is possibly ammonium hydrosulfide.
Scientists believe that below the visible cloud tops of ammonia reside layers of ammonium hydrosulfide and water vapor, but they found only wisps of gases and some evidence of water droplets.
The key finding: cloud particles at the top of the great storm are composed of a mix of three substances: water ice, ammonia ice, and an uncertain third constituent that is possibly ammonium hydrosulfide. According to the Wisconsin researchers, the observations are consistent with clouds of different chemical compositions existing side-by-side, although a more likely scenario is that the individual cloud particles are composed of two or all three of the materials.
Jupiter's bright zones are high clouds of ammonia crystals and possibly ammonium hydrosulfide (NH4SH), an ingredient in stink bombs.
Scientists have conjectured that two additional cloud layers, of ammonium hydrosulfide and water ice, lie directly below, but no one knows for sure.
This depth would most likely place the lightning flashes in the middle cloud layer, which is made of ammonium hydrosulfide (NH4SH), or possibly in the water-ice clouds deeper still in the layered decks.
Because spectra taken by the Hubble Space Telescope appeared to betray the presence of large amounts of sulfur, some researchers have argued that the fragments did burrow deeper--breaching a layer of ammonium hydrosulfide believed to lie beneath the ammonia clouds (SN: 7/30/94, p.68).
The orange and brown shades are caused by contaminants (perhaps ammonium hydrosulfide) welling up from below.
Beneath this may be a layer of ammonium hydrosulfide. The deepest layer is thought to contain water.
And this should give rise not only to clouds of ammonia (N[H.sub.3], the clouds whose tops we see from Earth), but also layers farther down thought to consist of ammonium hydrosulfide (N[H.sub.4]SH) and water ([H.sub.2]O).