ammonium persulfate

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ammonium persulfate

[ə′mōn·yəm pər′səl‚fāt]
(inorganic chemistry)
(NH4)2S2O8 White crystals which decompose on melting; soluble in water; used as an oxidizing agent and bleaching agent, and in etching, electroplating, food preservation, and aniline dyes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Figure 1 shows the variation of electrical resistivity as a function of temperature of pure PPy samples with different oxidizing agents (ferric chloride and ammonium persulphate).
Other possible reason why ammonium persulphate has lower conductivity could be related to the addition of anionic surfactant and its more interaction with it, which as a result causes decrease in conductivity.
Figure 7 shows DSC results for synthesized PPy for different oxidants, ferric chloride (Fe[Cl.sub.3]) and ammonium persulphate ([(N[H.sub.4]).sub.2][S.sub.2][O.sub.8]), while Figure 8 shows DSC results for different concentrations of ferric chloride oxidant.
Figure 7 shows the comparison of the two oxidants, ferric chloride and ammonium persulphate. As shown in Figure 7, the PPy sample with ferric chloride as an oxidant had a higher melting point than the PPy sample with ammonium persulphate as an oxidant and also slightly had a higher glass transition temperature for Fe[Cl.sub.3] samples.
Ferric chloride as an oxidant had a better performance than the other oxidant, ammonium persulphate. Hence, for further investigation, the influence of different concentrations of ferric chloride on the PPy samples in terms of resistivity and thermal stability was studied.
Figure 9 shows the TGA curves for PPy samples with different oxidants (ferric chloride and ammonium persulphate), while Figure 10 shows PPy samples with different concentrations of ferric chloride.
Therefore, as shown in Figure 9, PPy samples with ferric chloride oxidant show overall higher thermal stabilities compared to PPy samples with ammonium persulphate oxidant.
As shown in Figure 11, the prominent observed peaks and the diffraction in PPy samples with ferric chloride and ammonium persulphate were registered at 2[theta], equals 21[degrees] and 20[degrees], respectively.