Amoret


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Amoret (Amoretta)

typical of female loveliness. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene, Brewer Dictionary, 30]

Amoret

Sir Scudamore’s wife; loving and ever-devoted. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
References in periodicals archive ?
Lucrece, like Spenser's wandering Amoret, becomes a literal victim of Petrarchan rhetoric.
Jane's isolation and unhappiness in marriage and Mark's dereliction of his role as husband parallel the situation of Amoret and Scudamour in Books III and IV of The Faerie Queene.
The above-quoted scene occurs after a masque in Busirane's castle, where the various stages of courtly love have been allegorized; after that complex staging Spenser allows his reader to witness the physical suffering of Amoret.
It is Scudamore's task, not hers, to free Amoret from the enchanter Busirane.
Amoret Bancshares Inc, a Butler, Missouri-based bank holding company, has signed an agreement with the Federal Reserve on Monday released agreeing not to pay dividends or incur debt without approval from the Fed.
In 'Providential Love and Suffering in The Faerie Queene, Book III', Jason Gleckman usefully connects the anguish of feminine characters like Amoret and Britomart to codes of Protestant providentialism that attempt to resolve sexual desire, love melancholy, and the companionate marriage.
Spenser added the language of fraud and conveyancing to the images of magic in the story of Amoret and Scudamore in the 1596 edition of The Faerie Queene--thereby changing "Amoret's story from a mystical conception of marriage to a problem of fraudulent conveyances used to defeat purchasers" (79).
Amoret Dee Clarke, aged 21, of Langdale Avenue, Holbrooks, Coventry, driving with excess alcohol, fined pounds 150, banned from driving for one year and a drink drive course accepted.
Amoret is not only imprisoned by Busirane: she is also imprisoned by his allegorical masques and pageants on love, by his perceptions of her and his desire to interpret her.
A classic locus of the Hermaphrodite as Platonic ideal is Spenser's original 1590 ending to book 3 of The Faerie Queene, the union of Scudamour and Amoret outside the house of Busirane: "Had ye them seene, ye would have surely thought,/That they had been that faire Hermaphrodite" (3.
1, which express themselves in terms of imprisonment or bondage, with the imprisonment of Amoret.