Amphiaraüs

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Amphiaraüs

(ăm'fēərā`əs), in Greek mythology, a prophet, one of the ill-fated Seven against ThebesSeven against Thebes,
in Greek legend, seven heroes—Polynices, Adrastus, Amphiaraüs, Hippomedon, Capaneus, Tydeus, and Parthenopaeus—who made war on Eteocles, king of Thebes.
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. He foresaw the disaster of the expedition, but Polynices bribed his wife, Eriphyle, with the magic necklace of Harmonia, to convince him to go. Before setting out he commanded his sons, Alcmaeon and Amphilochus, to avenge his death and to make a second expedition against Thebes. Amphiaraüs was also one of the Argonauts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among those topics are proxy incubations and priestly incubation, an illustrated catalog of incubation reliefs from the cults of Asklepios and Amphiaraos, hypnos/somnus and oneiros as evidence for incubation at Asklepieia: a reassessment, Egyptian festivals and divinatory incubation, and whether lepers' visions at Hammat Gader (Emmatha) are a form of incubation in late antique Syria.
Aristophanes and Xenophon both discuss the practice of bathing prior to incubation in Asklepieia, and this practice extended to the healing cult of Amphiaraos as well.
Perhaps the most instructive or suggestive lizards in Archaic art appear on a well-known (if long lost) Late Corinthian krater depicting the story of Amphiaraos, once in Berlin and dated ca.
Around, above, and below the human figures is a large menagerie of assorted creatures: a scorpion on a column of the propylon in front of the chariot, an owl above the horses' heads, a bird and snake above Halimedes, a lizard behind the palace, and beneath Amphiaraos himself a hare, a hedgehog, and another lizard.
Although the scene on the Arkesilas cup seems innocuous, a suspiciously large number of animals (lizard, birds, monkey) are present in the field, recalling the strange menagerie on the Amphiaraos krater (Fig.
Edlund (1980) interprets the animals on the Amphiaraos krater (and elsewhere) differently, rejecting their ominous connotations and arguing instead that the hedgehog is a symbol of wisdom and courage, the hare a symbol of speed, and the lizard a symbol of endurance or action.
There is, incidentally, another grouping of at least one snake and two lizards on a fragmentary Late Corinthian column krater in the Princeton University Art Museum (2002-157), and though the subject is unclear--chariots and long-robed pedestrians are depicted--in the light of the Amphiaraos krater, the mood should perhaps be taken as similarly dark and foreboding.