Amphitryon

(redirected from Amphitrion)
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Amphitryon

(ămfĭ`trēən, –ŏn'), in Greek mythology, son of Alcaeus. While betrothed to Alcmene, he accidentally killed her father, Electryon. Alcmene and Amphitryon fled to Thebes, but she demanded that he defeat Pterelaos, her father's enemy. This Amphitryon did, but on the night of his return Zeus took Amphitryon's form and came into Alcmene's bed. That night she conceived children by both Zeus and Amphitryon. Hercules was the son of Zeus, Iphicles the son of Amphitryon.
References in periodicals archive ?
La comedia de Amphitrion begins with an "Introyto y argumento" (13-17).
The first scene of the Amphitrion is Timoneda's own invention within the original framework.
In this scene, Sosia recounts to Amphitrion the tribulations that he has just undergone, to his master's disbelief.
Similarly, the seventh scene, in which Amphitrion and Sosia communicate conflicting stories to Blefaron, relies almost entirely on Villalobos's filling-in of lacunae.
The maid Tessala (Bromia in Plautus and Villalobos) exits awestruck from the house and explains to an equally bewildered Amphitrion the circumstances surrounding Alcumena's delivery.
La comedia de Amphitrion may be considered an autonomous theatrical text, primarily because of the skillful adaptation of Villalobos's reading version and the invention of humorous episodes and speeches.
She notes that Timoneda's Comedia de Amphitrion, for example, is "a horizontal borrowing (from a source in castellano) of a vertical translation (from the Latin original)," which reveals a paradoxical shift from performance potential to didacticism and back to performance (247, 249).
Plautus Francisco Lopez de Juan de Timoneda Luis de Camoes Villalobos Amphitruo Anfitrion La comedia de Auto dos Enfatrioes Amphitrion Mercurios Mercurio Mercurio Mercurio Sosia Sosia Sosia Tardio Sosia Iuppiter Jupiter Jupiter Jupiter Alcumena Alcumena Alcumena Almena Amphitruo Anfitrion Amphitrion Anfatriao Thessala Tesala Tessala Blepharo Blefaron Blefaron Belferrao Bromia Bromia Bromia Bromio Pascuala Morato Roseno Feliseu Calisto Aurelio Moco
Reynolds discusses the full literary production, including a chapter on Timoneda's theater (77-102; the Comedia de Amphitrion 93-94).
Pabon emphasizes the presence of folkloric elements and local color in Amphitrion.