Amphitryon

(redirected from Amphitruo)
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Amphitryon

(ămfĭ`trēən, –ŏn'), in Greek mythology, son of Alcaeus. While betrothed to Alcmene, he accidentally killed her father, Electryon. Alcmene and Amphitryon fled to Thebes, but she demanded that he defeat Pterelaos, her father's enemy. This Amphitryon did, but on the night of his return Zeus took Amphitryon's form and came into Alcmene's bed. That night she conceived children by both Zeus and Amphitryon. Hercules was the son of Zeus, Iphicles the son of Amphitryon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ademas, ya en el siglo XV las comedias de Plauto, en especial su Amphitruo, habian influido de forma decisiva en Francisco de Sa de Miranda (Rebello, Historia 47).
Plauto Amphitruo, 279) (Ni yo-NoM todavia noche-ACU mas-largo me-ACU haber-visto-INF considerar-PRES-1s) Yo no creo [que haya visto nunca una noche mas larga].
Commenting on the many early modern adaptations of the "Plautine door knocking and lock-out in Amphitruo," Robert Miola draws attention to Adriana's "expanded role" in Shakespeare's play (Leggatt 1974, 24).
On this same reckoning, if Platus is the source, the most likely passages would be Amphitruo 254, impransus fui, or Stichus 533, impransus sum.
A number of ancient dramatists presented the theme, notably Plautus, whose comedy Amphitruo still survives.
In the body of the volume--the discussion of Errors--Riehle's primary thesis is that Plautine features are pervasive in the play, not confined to plot-arrangement as has previously been assumed, and that the Amphitruo is a more important model than the Menaechmi.
The sources of the plot are the Menaechmi and the Amphitruo of Plautus, both written in the 2nd century bc.
Na quinta e ultima seccao, Ferruccio Bertini, a quem o volume e dedicado, apresenta um estudo comparado entre o Amphitruo de Plauto e a obra, escrita numa lingua nao-romance, Jack Juggler, de Nicholas Udall, autor do seculo XVI.
argues that Comedy, particularly Plautine, can introduce gods and lofty material into its plot-lines without compromising its identity and she uses Amphitruo as her example and analogy and in support of her characterisation of the fable as a story in the comic genre.
The ingenious commingling of deities and mortals in a quasi-adulterous menage a trois gives Plautus's Amphitruo a broad comic appeal and a plot line that subsequent playwrights frequently have borrowed.
The beginning point centers around the plays of Plautus, especially Menaechmi, Amphitruo, Mostellaria, Captivi, Miles Gloriosus, Casina, and Rudens, and of Terence, especially Andria, Eunuchus, Hecyra, and Adelphoe.
This startling innovation may be seen in Plautus' Amphitruo.