amyloid

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Related to Amyloid protein: Tau protein, Amyloid precursor protein

amyloid

[′am·ə‚lȯid]
(pathology)
An abnormal protein deposited in tissues, formed from the infiltration of an unknown substance, probably a carbohydrate.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This and other findings suggest that tau buildup plays a greater role in Alzheimer's than the more widely studied amyloid protein. Research into amyloid has so far failed to result in effective Alzheimer's treatments, according to the UCSF team.
This new drug candidate targets not only the amyloid protein, but also the tau proteins, which are associated with the neuro-fibrillary tangles.
The team converted milk proteins into fibers of durable amyloid protein. Other amyloids are infamous for building up in the brains of Alzheimer's patients, but the team put its amyloids' sticky tendrils to different use.
However, one cysteine amino acid (Cys79) from CRD2 domain participated in hydrogen bond with Nterminal of beta amyloid protein. In addition to this, A[beta]42 specifically binds to the topical region of the receptor where the binding was stabilized by a small cleft nearer to CRD2 domain and this supported the "cap" like conformation of A[beta]42 ligand.
Chemical typing of amyloid protein contained in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens.
Alzheimer's is linked to the build-up of amyloid protein, which eventually forms "senile plaques".
Amyloidosis is classified on the basis of the amyloid protein's constituent chemical fibrils.
Two proteins that have been strongly implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease are the Alzheimer amyloid protein precursor (APP) and the LDL receptor-related protein (LRP).
"This is the first controlled study that has been completed in the world, testing this theory, based on the amyloid protein hypothesis.
Boniface Hospital Research Centre, have made a significant discovery by matching a single brain communication protein from millions of brain proteins with a diseased Alzheimer's Amyloid Protein. This find is significant as the match indicates a brain communication pathway whose function can be probed.
"Our work shows definitive evidence that the brain areas promoting wakefulness degenerate due to accumulation of tau -- not amyloid protein -- from the very earliest stages of the disease," Lea Grinberg, senior study author and an associate professor at the Memory and Aging CenterA at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), said.