amyloid

(redirected from Amyloids)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Amyloids: amyloidosis

amyloid

[′am·ə‚lȯid]
(pathology)
An abnormal protein deposited in tissues, formed from the infiltration of an unknown substance, probably a carbohydrate.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's exciting to see that the amyloids can hold more than their own mass in heavy metal particles, Li says.
Four of the seven peptides formed amyloids which had the ability to catalyse the hydrolysis of organic molecules called esters - a reaction that some enzymes catalyse too.
The test provides an accurate diagnosis by identifying even small quantities of amyloid-beta clusters- the toxic proteins responsible for Alzheimer's disease- present in the blood stream, and differentiating them from the individual amyloid proteins found in healthy people.
The new research raises the prospect of treating the root cause of heart failure by preventing the formation of desmin amyloids, said Dr Agnetti.
1,2) In 1875, Burow was the first to describe amyloid deposits in the larynx.
It is currently believed that this type of experimental amyloidosis is due to the abnormal production and degradation of serum amyloid A protein (SAA).
They found that the EGCG effectively dissolved the amyloids in the weaker version however stronger amyloids were not dissolved and that some transformed to even stronger versions after exposure to EGCG.
Scientists envision several ways that blood cholesterol could influence the amyloid produced by cells in the brain.
This is the first time that anyone has stopped the development of amyloid plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimer's," says Marcelle Morrison-Bogorad of the National Institute on Aging in Bethesda, Md.
If amyloid plaques are only an effect of the disease, which is what I and others believe, what good would it do to block their build-up?
This finding establishes for the first time a direct link between beta amyloid and neuron destruction in live animals, says study coauthor Neil W.
Some scientists have suggested that an abnormal gene codes for the overproduction of amyloid protein in patients with Alzheimer's disease.