Anabaptist

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Anabaptist

1. a member of any of various 16th-century Protestant movements that rejected infant baptism, insisted that adults be rebaptized, and sought to establish Christian communism
2. a member of a later Protestant sect holding the same doctrines, esp with regard to baptism
References in periodicals archive ?
There are indications, however, that this trepidation about uniting oneself with Christ during Holy Communion, which encourages self-examination, finds currency also in early Anabaptism, with Marpeck as the leading spokesperson.
As has been adequately documented and dramatized by many artists and writers, Anabaptism has been no less prone than any other sect become establishment to its own institutional hierarchies and oppressions.
Furthermore, although Mackay has done his homework when it comes to primary source materials, he does not appear to be as firmly grounded in the secondary literature on this event or on Melchiorite Anabaptism more generally.
2) Do Anabaptism and the Free Spirit heresy cast any light on the motivations, objectives, and conduct of the mutiny leader Corneliesz?
This important book should be read by anyone interested in ethnic studies, Anabaptism, western Canadian history, or conflict resolution studies.
Here Reynolds discusses the origins of this group in Anabaptism and Pietism.
The practice of the leaders, often with autocratic tendencies, fuelled by convictions based on visions, was at odds with the participative emphasis found elsewhere in early Anabaptism.
Reading this new book by James Stayer, well-known historian of Anabaptism, my first thought was: "Is Saul also among the prophets?
That year of tumult began a steady stream of permanently transforming encounters, discoveries and adventures: hearing Dan Berrigan do Bible study, stumbling upon the Catholic Worker movement, learning theology from radical Australian Baptists being introduced to Dietrich Bonhoeffer and William Stringfellow and Anabaptism, meeting Sojourners, being introduced to civil disobedience and nonviolence at Jonah House.
In 1943 Bender presented his influential essay, "The Anabaptist Vision," as the presidential address before the American Society of Church History in which he not only attempted to rehabilitate nonresistant Anabaptism from the twin specters of Muntzer and Munster, but also laid out a vision for twentieth-century Mennonite life.
Good general accounts of Anabaptism are rare in English, and this English edition, based on a 1988 revision and incorporating some material on English Anabaptists, and a new chapter on the `ordinary' Anabaptist, is most welcome.