cashew

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cashew

(kăsh`o͞o, kəsho͞o`), tropical American tree (Anacardium occidentale) of the family Anacardiaceae (sumacsumac
or sumach
, common name for some members of the Anacardiaceae, a family of trees and shrubs native chiefly to the tropics but ranging into north temperate regions and characterized by resinous, often acrid, sap.
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 family), valued chiefly for the cashew nut of commerce. The tree's acrid sap is used in making a varnish that protects woodwork and books from insects. The fruit is kidney-shaped, about an inch in length, and has a double shell. The kernel or cashew nut, which is sweet, oily, and nutritious, is much used for food in the tropics after being roasted to destroy the caustic juice. It yields a light-colored oil said to be the equal of olive oil and is utilized in various culinary ways. In the West Indies it is used to flavor wine, particularly Madeira, and is imported into Great Britain for this purpose. The nut grows on the end of a fleshy, pear-shaped stalk, called the cashew apple, which is white, yellow, or red, juicy and slightly acid, and is eaten, used for juice, and fermented to make an alcoholic beverage. Cashews are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Anacardiaceae.

Cashew

 

(Anacardium occidentale), a tree up to 12 m tall of the family Anacardiaceae. It is cultivated in the tropics. The shell of the nutlike fruit yields cashew oil, which is used in medicine; there is also an edible nucleus. The pear-shaped peduncle, known as the cashew apple, has a pleasant bittersweet taste, is rich in vitamin C, and is valued as a fruit. A gum is made from the trunks of old cashew trees. Articles made from cashew wood are resistant to decay.

REFERENCES

Alekseev, V. P. “Kazhu, akazhu: Anacardium occidentale L.” Subtropicheskie kul’tury, 1959, no 1.
Siniagin, I. I. Tropicheskie zemledelie. Moscow, 1968. Pages 417–19.

cashew

[′kash·ü]
(botany)
Anacardium occidentale. An evergreen tree of the order Sapindales grown for its kidney-shaped edible nuts and resinous oil.

cashew

1. a tropical American anacardiaceous evergreen tree, Anacardium occidentale, bearing kidney-shaped nuts that protrude from a fleshy receptacle
2. the edible nut of this tree
References in periodicals archive ?
Serial number Plant Extract used NPs 1 Cacumen platycladi Whole biomass PtNPs 2 Anacardium occidentale Leaf PtNPs 3 Diospyros kaki Leaf PtNPs 4 Ocimum sanctum Leaf PtNPs 5 Fumariae herba Whole herb PtNPs 6 Curcuma longa Tuber PdNPs 7 Gardenia jasminoides Ellis Fruit PdNPs 8 Glycine max Leaf PdNPs 9 Punica granatum Peel PtNPs 10 Cinnamomum camphora Leaf PdNPs 11 Annona squamosa L.
Liu et al., "Effect of dietary supplementation with Anacardium occidentale on growth performance and immune and visceral organ weights in replacement laying pullets," Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment, vol.
Nurhaizan et al., "Phytochemical screening, in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of aqueous extract of Anacardium occidentale Linn.
Here in this study, we investigated the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of leaf extract from Anacardium occidentale in an "in vitro" model of inflammation.
With the aim of gaining insight into epidermal structure, composition, epicuticular wax, and function in relation to water-leaf surface interactions, we analyzed the adaxial and abaxial leaf surface of Anacardium occidentale L.
A comparison of two pollinators: the introduced honey bee (Apis mellifera) and a indigenous bee (Centris tarsata) on cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) in its native range of NE Brazil.
cornuphallus was recovered from fruit of cashew (Anacardium occidentale, Anacardiaceae) collected in the municipality of Valenca (13[degrees]18'S; 39[degrees]15'W).
Oladeru, design, fabrication and testing of cashew nut (anacardium occidentale) shelling machine.
1865)), mango (Mangifera indica, Linnaeus 1753), cashew (Anacardium occidentale, Linnaeus 1753), and rain tree (Samanea saman (Jacquin) Merrill 1916) and have strong feeding preference towards fallen tender leaves (personal observation).