Anacreon


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Anacreon

(ənăk`rēən, –ŏn), c.570–c.485 B.C., Greek lyric poet, b. Teos in Ionia. He lived at Samos and at Athens, where his patron was Hipparchus. His poetry, graceful and elegant, celebrates the joys of wine and love. Little of his verse survives. Anacreontics, poems in the style of Anacreon, were written from Hellenistic to late Byzantine times.

Anacreon

 

Born about 570 B.C.; died about 487 B.C. Ancient Greek poet.

The basic motifs in Anacreon’s lyric poetry, of which only small fragments have been preserved, are sensual love, wine, and a carefree life. Poems of this style later became known as Anacreontic poems. A. S. Pushkin, L. A. Mei, and others translated Anacreon into Russian.

WORKS

[“Fragments.”] In Poetae melici graeci. Edited by D. Page. Oxford, 1962.
In Russian translation:
Anakreont: Pervoe polnoe sobr. ego soch. v perevodakh russkikh pisatelei. Edited by A. Tambovskii. St. Petersburg, [1896].
[“Fragmenty.”] In Grecheskaia epigramma.[Moscow, 1960.]

REFERENCE

Iarkho, V., and K. Polonskaia. Antichnaia lirika. Moscow, 1967.

Anacreon

(563–478 B.C.) Greek lyric poet who idealized the pleasures of love. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Love

Anacreon

(563–478 B. C.) Greek lyric poet who praised the effects of wine. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Wine

Anacreon

?572--?488 bc, Greek lyric poet, noted for his short songs celebrating love and wine
References in periodicals archive ?
In an 1881 review of the subject, the Scottish journalist Alexander Japp draws connections to other times and places, stating that "Society-verse, in our sense of it, includes certain products of all polished times, which become fully or imaginatively realizable only through experience, more or less direct, of similar conditions." (20) He insists that many writers will have "produced the thing before it had received the name" of society verse and uses this as justification for going much further back in time, joining D'Israeli in including Anacreon and then adding Theocritus, Petrarch, and others whose elite verse was produced under presumably similar social conditions to modern Europe (p.
Ifill, "Whitman's Two 'Midnight Visitors,'" Conversations: The Newsletter of the Walt Whitman Association (Winter 2015-16), 1-8; and Arthur Golden, "The Text of a Whitman Lincoln Lecture Reading: Anacreon's 'The Midnight Visitor,'" WWQR 6 (Fall 1988), 91-94.
Yunus Uksfurdi (Oxford Jones), produced not only a Shakaristan (a chest of sugar), as the grammar was titled in Persian, but a gulistan (bower of roses), replete with the beauties of "the Persian Anacreon" Hafiz, a ruba'i (quatrain) and a half by Omar Khayyam, and the love-songs of Firdausi: "If I could sleep one night on thy bosom, I should seem to touch the sky with my exalted head." A book proffering Oriental breasts and chests of rupees was likely to succeed.
(21) The woman addressed as a "Thracian filly" in Anacreon, fr.
Imitate Anacreon! Mimesis, Poiesis and the Poetic Inspiration in the Carmina Anacreontea
It is a drinking song, it turns out, but a very upper-crust drinking song, ''To Anacreon in Heaven,'' which pays tribute to a high-end gentleman's club in London.
Some famous Greek relationships were Achilles and Patroclus, Orestes and Pylades, Socrates and Alcibiades, and Theognis and Anacreon.
45.11: dulcis pueri ebrios ocellos, where the poet presents a boy's eyes as drunk with love (as in Anacreon 17D: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) (18), is a characteristic example; cf.
Anacreon, and Sybaris--most likely dates from 1757.
'Similarly to the others [Catullus, Ovid, Anacreon and other ancient poets], Petrarch experienced all the tortures of love and those of jealousy, but all his pleasures were spiritual', Batyushkov writes.
Whilst the Society's most obvious legacy might appear to be such popular tunes as 'To Anacreon in Heaven'--now heard regularly as the melody to 'The Star Spangled Banner'--McVeigh reveals that a series of pre-dinner concerts at the Anacreontic not only employed many of London's leading musicians but offered a discerning audience of influential amateurs and members of the musical establishment the opportunity to 'vet' the latest performers and composers before their transference to more prestigious public concert venues such as the Hanover Square Rooms.
Anacreon also claims wanting to dive "from the White Rock/into the dark waves [...] intoxicated with lust." In Euripides' Cyclops the same connection appears, between intoxication and the speaker's throwing himself "from the white rock into the brine" (apud Nagy 1996: 39).