Anacreon


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Anacreon

(ənăk`rēən, –ŏn), c.570–c.485 B.C., Greek lyric poet, b. Teos in Ionia. He lived at Samos and at Athens, where his patron was Hipparchus. His poetry, graceful and elegant, celebrates the joys of wine and love. Little of his verse survives. Anacreontics, poems in the style of Anacreon, were written from Hellenistic to late Byzantine times.

Anacreon

 

Born about 570 B.C.; died about 487 B.C. Ancient Greek poet.

The basic motifs in Anacreon’s lyric poetry, of which only small fragments have been preserved, are sensual love, wine, and a carefree life. Poems of this style later became known as Anacreontic poems. A. S. Pushkin, L. A. Mei, and others translated Anacreon into Russian.

WORKS

[“Fragments.”] In Poetae melici graeci. Edited by D. Page. Oxford, 1962.
In Russian translation:
Anakreont: Pervoe polnoe sobr. ego soch. v perevodakh russkikh pisatelei. Edited by A. Tambovskii. St. Petersburg, [1896].
[“Fragmenty.”] In Grecheskaia epigramma.[Moscow, 1960.]

REFERENCE

Iarkho, V., and K. Polonskaia. Antichnaia lirika. Moscow, 1967.

Anacreon

(563–478 B.C.) Greek lyric poet who idealized the pleasures of love. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Love

Anacreon

(563–478 B. C.) Greek lyric poet who praised the effects of wine. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Wine

Anacreon

?572--?488 bc, Greek lyric poet, noted for his short songs celebrating love and wine
References in periodicals archive ?
Through Moore's hybrid songs, I argue, Anacreon became a charged emblem of colonial subordination.
Quevedo cita el versiculo tambien en otras obras en prosa, desde Anacreon castellano y la Execracion contra los judios, a Virtud militante.
11: dulcis pueri ebrios ocellos, where the poet presents a boy's eyes as drunk with love (as in Anacreon 17D: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) (18), is a characteristic example; cf.
Anacreon, and Sybaris--most likely dates from 1757.
Similarly to the others [Catullus, Ovid, Anacreon and other ancient poets], Petrarch experienced all the tortures of love and those of jealousy, but all his pleasures were spiritual', Batyushkov writes.
Whilst the Society's most obvious legacy might appear to be such popular tunes as 'To Anacreon in Heaven'--now heard regularly as the melody to 'The Star Spangled Banner'--McVeigh reveals that a series of pre-dinner concerts at the Anacreontic not only employed many of London's leading musicians but offered a discerning audience of influential amateurs and members of the musical establishment the opportunity to 'vet' the latest performers and composers before their transference to more prestigious public concert venues such as the Hanover Square Rooms.
Anacreon also claims wanting to dive "from the White Rock/into the dark waves [.
Achilleos argues that little attention has been given to how the figure of Anacreon is so frequently evoked in Hesperides as the convivial verses in which he appears are often trivialized as apolitical, rather than contextualized in light of the period's controversy surrounding festivities and communal drinking.
The speaker, on the other hand, is a modern day Anacreon sitting in a spa and composing ironic georgics, wishing "that this gym served chilled champagne / so I could toast the brothers Jacuzzi.
Another example of the erotic conception of fields in archaic Greek lyric is a fragmentary poem by Anacreon (Fragment 346.
The fact is that though she made translations of these Anacreon poems, so did her husband.
It's a given that the sports fan will hear some courageous soul attempt the impossibly leaping melody that Key borrowed from "To Anacreon in Heaven," a popular song of a British fraternal order.