Anacreon

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Anacreon

(ənăk`rēən, –ŏn), c.570–c.485 B.C., Greek lyric poet, b. Teos in Ionia. He lived at Samos and at Athens, where his patron was Hipparchus. His poetry, graceful and elegant, celebrates the joys of wine and love. Little of his verse survives. Anacreontics, poems in the style of Anacreon, were written from Hellenistic to late Byzantine times.

Anacreon

 

Born about 570 B.C.; died about 487 B.C. Ancient Greek poet.

The basic motifs in Anacreon’s lyric poetry, of which only small fragments have been preserved, are sensual love, wine, and a carefree life. Poems of this style later became known as Anacreontic poems. A. S. Pushkin, L. A. Mei, and others translated Anacreon into Russian.

WORKS

[“Fragments.”] In Poetae melici graeci. Edited by D. Page. Oxford, 1962.
In Russian translation:
Anakreont: Pervoe polnoe sobr. ego soch. v perevodakh russkikh pisatelei. Edited by A. Tambovskii. St. Petersburg, [1896].
[“Fragmenty.”] In Grecheskaia epigramma.[Moscow, 1960.]

REFERENCE

Iarkho, V., and K. Polonskaia. Antichnaia lirika. Moscow, 1967.

Anacreon

(563–478 B.C.) Greek lyric poet who idealized the pleasures of love. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Love

Anacreon

(563–478 B. C.) Greek lyric poet who praised the effects of wine. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Wine

Anacreon

?572--?488 bc, Greek lyric poet, noted for his short songs celebrating love and wine
References in periodicals archive ?
The arguments among scholars who aligned value with authorial authenticity in the centuries following were of little significance to the poets who sought to outdo each other's imitations of "Anacreon." (31) Like the Anacreontea's original poets, these imitators took origins for granted, or simply cared less about origins than literary interest.
The ballad's rise in print corresponds almost exactly with the discovery of the Anacreontea and its traditions of emulation throughout Europe.
In the summer of 2011, specialists in the Carmine Anacreontea from around the world gathered in Zurich for a conference on the collection of 60 short poems dating from the late Hellenistic times to the sixth century CE.
More importantly, it would have been chronologically impossible for a character in 330 BC to remember a line from the Anacreontea, for these poems were 'not composed before the Hellenistic period, most of them perhaps not until the Roman and Byzantine eras' (Campbell 1988:10).
In the instance from the Anacreontea it is Ares, the mighty god of war, who 'sighs [groans] deeply' and cries out to the godling Cupid.
Radt); Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotheke 17.117.2; Apollonius Sophisticos, Homeric Lexicon 34.28; Joseph and Aseneth 8.8; Anacreontea 18.4; Clementine Homilies 5.3.2; and in The Acts of Paul 4.12) and five similarly 'additional' instances of the use of the cognate verbs [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], and [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (Homer, Iliad 10.b'; 18.355; Bion, The Lament for Adonis 1.80; Galen, On the doctrines of Hippocrates and Plato 3.2.11; Rhianus, Fragment 73.3; Epigrammata 12.142; and Chrysippus of Acraiphia, 906.14).
Elegy and Iambus with the Anacreontea. Loeb Classical Library.
This influence persisted for three centuries after 1544, when the French classicist Henri Estienne (Henry Stephen in English) published the Carmina Anacreontea: sixty odes regarded as authentic works of Anacreon, accompanied by Stephen's Latin translations of them and works by Sappho, Pindar, and other Greek poets.
When Du Bellay magnanimously praises the country's abundant natural resources, he imitates drunken, repetitious speech, concluding that he can no longer remember, because he has been made to drink so much.(104) Again, the link with Belleau might appear to be gratuitous, but only if one forgets that Belleau had just published (1556) his translation of the Carmina Anacreontea, where drinking and love are important themes.
This metre, [Greek Text Omitted], remains unchanged in each of the poem's nine lines, and in current descriptions it is considered a pherecratean,(1) which is thought to have been felt by the ancient author as assimilable either to a pure ionic dimeter with contraction of the biceps in the first foot (there is but a single sure instance of this kind in the Anacreontea: 44.2; in 52A.3 either the text is corrupt or prosody is faulty),(2) or to a hemiambic with anaclasis giving a trochaic second foot.(3) The second interpretation seems more plausible, because 'pherecratean' hemiambics are more numerous in the Anacreontea,(4) but these instances also are lines where the structure in question originates as the isolated and accidental outcome of anaclasis.
The author agrees with modern editors of the Anacreontea that, although Etienne claimed to have used two manuscripts for his edition (with a partial Latin translation and commentary) there is no evidence of a second manuscript.
West in his edition (Carmina Anacreontea, Leipzig, 1984), namely Ovid, Ars Am.