Anacreon

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Anacreon

(ənăk`rēən, –ŏn), c.570–c.485 B.C., Greek lyric poet, b. Teos in Ionia. He lived at Samos and at Athens, where his patron was Hipparchus. His poetry, graceful and elegant, celebrates the joys of wine and love. Little of his verse survives. Anacreontics, poems in the style of Anacreon, were written from Hellenistic to late Byzantine times.

Anacreon

 

Born about 570 B.C.; died about 487 B.C. Ancient Greek poet.

The basic motifs in Anacreon’s lyric poetry, of which only small fragments have been preserved, are sensual love, wine, and a carefree life. Poems of this style later became known as Anacreontic poems. A. S. Pushkin, L. A. Mei, and others translated Anacreon into Russian.

WORKS

[“Fragments.”] In Poetae melici graeci. Edited by D. Page. Oxford, 1962.
In Russian translation:
Anakreont: Pervoe polnoe sobr. ego soch. v perevodakh russkikh pisatelei. Edited by A. Tambovskii. St. Petersburg, [1896].
[“Fragmenty.”] In Grecheskaia epigramma.[Moscow, 1960.]

REFERENCE

Iarkho, V., and K. Polonskaia. Antichnaia lirika. Moscow, 1967.

Anacreon

(563–478 B.C.) Greek lyric poet who idealized the pleasures of love. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Love

Anacreon

(563–478 B. C.) Greek lyric poet who praised the effects of wine. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Wine

Anacreon

?572--?488 bc, Greek lyric poet, noted for his short songs celebrating love and wine
References in periodicals archive ?
The ballad's rise in print corresponds almost exactly with the discovery of the Anacreontea and its traditions of emulation throughout Europe.
The Anacreontea began to disappear from the popular (and even mainstream scholarly) imagination by the end of the nineteenth century, and as a consequence we are more likely to identify its themes as ones that emanate from Moore than from an ancient source.
22) The most complete bibliography of English translations (it does not include imitative poems) is by Stuart Gillespie: "The Anacreontea in English: A Checklist of Translations to 1900: With a Bibliography of Secondary Sources and Some Previously Unpublished Translations," Translation and Literature 11, no.
In the summer of 2011, specialists in the Carmine Anacreontea from around the world gathered in Zurich for a conference on the collection of 60 short poems dating from the late Hellenistic times to the sixth century CE.
In fact, Campbell (1988:16) dates the group to which Anacreontea 33 belongs 'to the last centuries BC and to AD 1-138'.
As I note in analyzing "Wine of Cyprus" in section two, his discussion of the poem with EBB indicates that both poets saw the Anacreontea as a compilation of later Greek texts, not the works Moore had pronounced "the most polished remains of antiquity" (p.
But even Stanley's "generally faithful translations of the Anacreontea expurgatefd] most of the homosexual content.
37) Anacreon is also the first Greek poet she mentions in the poem, in alluding to the turtledove that carries messages to his lovers and drinks from his cup: quite a pleasant gig, the dove explains to a stranger in the ode in question in the Anacreontea (Ode XV in Moore).
19 continues to be problematic, all the more since it is absolutely invariable, and even avoids any of the rational or irrational substitutions which are common both in the hemiambic and in the anacreontic Anacreontea (and also in the 'pherecratean' hemiambics quoted above, n.
19 to extend to the whole poem a metrical structure, the 'pherecratean' hemiambic, which he had found here and there in previous Anacreontea as isolated results of anaclasis and substitutions.
The author agrees with modern editors of the Anacreontea that, although Etienne claimed to have used two manuscripts for his edition (with a partial Latin translation and commentary) there is no evidence of a second manuscript.
West in his edition (Carmina Anacreontea, Leipzig, 1984), namely Ovid, Ars Am.