Anacreon

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Anacreon

(ənăk`rēən, –ŏn), c.570–c.485 B.C., Greek lyric poet, b. Teos in Ionia. He lived at Samos and at Athens, where his patron was Hipparchus. His poetry, graceful and elegant, celebrates the joys of wine and love. Little of his verse survives. Anacreontics, poems in the style of Anacreon, were written from Hellenistic to late Byzantine times.

Anacreon

 

Born about 570 B.C.; died about 487 B.C. Ancient Greek poet.

The basic motifs in Anacreon’s lyric poetry, of which only small fragments have been preserved, are sensual love, wine, and a carefree life. Poems of this style later became known as Anacreontic poems. A. S. Pushkin, L. A. Mei, and others translated Anacreon into Russian.

WORKS

[“Fragments.”] In Poetae melici graeci. Edited by D. Page. Oxford, 1962.
In Russian translation:
Anakreont: Pervoe polnoe sobr. ego soch. v perevodakh russkikh pisatelei. Edited by A. Tambovskii. St. Petersburg, [1896].
[“Fragmenty.”] In Grecheskaia epigramma.[Moscow, 1960.]

REFERENCE

Iarkho, V., and K. Polonskaia. Antichnaia lirika. Moscow, 1967.

Anacreon

(563–478 B.C.) Greek lyric poet who idealized the pleasures of love. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Love

Anacreon

(563–478 B. C.) Greek lyric poet who praised the effects of wine. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Wine

Anacreon

?572--?488 bc, Greek lyric poet, noted for his short songs celebrating love and wine
References in periodicals archive ?
These sections include works by The Anacreontic Song composer John Stafford Smith (1750-1836), drinking and fraternal parodies of the song, early American political parodies of the song, and other American patriotic songs like William Billings's Chester and Joseph Hopkinson's Hail Columbia, which served as the country's de facto national anthem throughout the nineteenth century.
In contrast, "Hasta cuando, Gerarda" reads as Anacreontic in form but certainly not content; it is a sober warning to her dear friend of the heartache that comes from squandering one's intellect and wit on frivolity, vanity, and love.
Actually, the melody was composed by John Stafford Smith, a London-based church musician who was hired to compose a song for the Anacreontic Society, a group described in the liner notes as "an all-male music and supper club.
Moore's Anacreontic drinking songs in Irish Melodies include "Come, Send Round the Wine" (234), "One Bumper at Parting" (245), and "The Wine Cup is Circling" (270), which share the common theme of drinking as a release from normative life.
As Ronsard writes in his liminary for Belleau's volume of Anacreontic odes: "Et pour venir a cest heur, ou malheur, combien depuis vingt ans avez vous veu de livres avortez en naissant, 'Plustost ensevelis sous les flanes de la tene, / Que jouir, bienheureux, des beaux rayons du jour?
39) And, as Joshua Scodel has demonstrated, English lyric poetry by Ben Jonson and others draws on Anacreontic and Horatian traditions to celebrate "drinking as a source of poetic inspiration," figuring the poet as "inspired drinker.
Whether when Browning created the fair copy of the ten Anacreontic translations he was aware that the seventh poem was an earlier version of a revised translation that he had placed or would place in his wife's Last Poems, we just cannot say.
3) Taking its name from Samuel Daniel's Delia (1592), this structure is exhibited in a number of English sonnet sequences including Shakespeare's, and consists of the sonnet sequence proper, Anacreontic verse (verse on lighter or mythological themes), and a complaint (a narrative poem, often written in the first person).
It contains the anacreontic message that although we may enjoy wine in the moonlight, both wine and moonlight will outlast us.
The Society concerts began in 1766 as a subscription concert series and a glee club for both dilettantes and music professionals, like the Anacreontic or Catch Clubs of London.
These features encourage a principally trochaic rhythm enlivened with the Anacreontic rhythm seen in many measured sources of mediaeval and later music, and already noted in relation to CSM 213.
17 The Anacreontic Song, sung by a club of London musicians in th 18th century, lent its melody to which far more famous song?