Anacreon

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Anacreon

(ənăk`rēən, –ŏn), c.570–c.485 B.C., Greek lyric poet, b. Teos in Ionia. He lived at Samos and at Athens, where his patron was Hipparchus. His poetry, graceful and elegant, celebrates the joys of wine and love. Little of his verse survives. Anacreontics, poems in the style of Anacreon, were written from Hellenistic to late Byzantine times.

Anacreon

 

Born about 570 B.C.; died about 487 B.C. Ancient Greek poet.

The basic motifs in Anacreon’s lyric poetry, of which only small fragments have been preserved, are sensual love, wine, and a carefree life. Poems of this style later became known as Anacreontic poems. A. S. Pushkin, L. A. Mei, and others translated Anacreon into Russian.

WORKS

[“Fragments.”] In Poetae melici graeci. Edited by D. Page. Oxford, 1962.
In Russian translation:
Anakreont: Pervoe polnoe sobr. ego soch. v perevodakh russkikh pisatelei. Edited by A. Tambovskii. St. Petersburg, [1896].
[“Fragmenty.”] In Grecheskaia epigramma.[Moscow, 1960.]

REFERENCE

Iarkho, V., and K. Polonskaia. Antichnaia lirika. Moscow, 1967.

Anacreon

(563–478 B.C.) Greek lyric poet who idealized the pleasures of love. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Love

Anacreon

(563–478 B. C.) Greek lyric poet who praised the effects of wine. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Wine

Anacreon

?572--?488 bc, Greek lyric poet, noted for his short songs celebrating love and wine
References in periodicals archive ?
Thelwall's anacreontics and paphiades are, as their names suggest, neoclassical in form and subject matter, reminiscent of erotic poetry by Ovid, Anacreon and Catullus, and in the Romantic period, closer to the love lyrics of Byron, Moore or the Della Cruscans than to anything ever written by Wordsworth.
Among the audiences who flocked to hear the notorious political lecturer in a new guise were a number of young women, the wives (and especially the daughters) of old radical friends, and it is to these young ladies that he addressed some ten or fifteen amatory odes written between 1803 and 1805, most of which are found in volume 2 of the manuscript, clustered before the anacreontics.
19 continues to be problematic, all the more since it is absolutely invariable, and even avoids any of the rational or irrational substitutions which are common both in the hemiambic and in the anacreontic Anacreontea (and also in the 'pherecratean' hemiambics quoted above, n.
Is it right to suppose that a poem by Bion might be so crucial a focus in an anacreontic author's mind as to let him use its incipit as an initial 'motto'?
Moore's interest in these Anacreontic themes is surprisingly close to the interest shown by Royalist poets under whom English Anacreontics originally flourished during the years of Civil War exile (these poets included Herrick, Richard Lovelace, Stanley, and Cowley).
See Katherine Duncan-Jones, "Sidney's Anacreontics," Review of English Studies 36 no.
Kaske shows how another of Spenser's works, the anacreontics, relates to Spenser's marriage hymn: the anacreontics provide 'some sort of bridge from sonnets to epithalamion' through the 'dramatization [of] the discomforts of the lover as fiance; all of them are expressions of sexual frustration which are portrayed as resolved in the Epithalamion'.
Anacreontics spouted up in diverse European languages in part because they embodied a lyric spontaneity and desire not found in Pindar's more formally elaborate commissioned odes celebrating "shining goals," to use EBB's words in "Wine of Cyprus" (1.
The Anacreontic "becomes more shadowy in the romantic period," as Brown observes, although Byron and Coleridge wrote Anacreontics and the language of Keats's odes--a poet beloved by EBB as well as Dickinson--is "heavily" suggestive of "the rhetoric of Anacreon." (23) As Judith Thompson's discoveries reveal, John Thelwall also wrote numerous Anacreontics.
Marjorie Stone published an important, ambitious essay on a poem almost entirely overlooked in recent years, "Wine of Cyprus." "Lyric Tipplers: Elizabeth Barrett Browning's 'Wine of Cyprus,' Emily Dickinson's 'I taste a liquor,' and the Transatlantic Anacreontic Tradition," VP 54, no.