Anacreon

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Anacreon

(ənăk`rēən, –ŏn), c.570–c.485 B.C., Greek lyric poet, b. Teos in Ionia. He lived at Samos and at Athens, where his patron was Hipparchus. His poetry, graceful and elegant, celebrates the joys of wine and love. Little of his verse survives. Anacreontics, poems in the style of Anacreon, were written from Hellenistic to late Byzantine times.

Anacreon

 

Born about 570 B.C.; died about 487 B.C. Ancient Greek poet.

The basic motifs in Anacreon’s lyric poetry, of which only small fragments have been preserved, are sensual love, wine, and a carefree life. Poems of this style later became known as Anacreontic poems. A. S. Pushkin, L. A. Mei, and others translated Anacreon into Russian.

WORKS

[“Fragments.”] In Poetae melici graeci. Edited by D. Page. Oxford, 1962.
In Russian translation:
Anakreont: Pervoe polnoe sobr. ego soch. v perevodakh russkikh pisatelei. Edited by A. Tambovskii. St. Petersburg, [1896].
[“Fragmenty.”] In Grecheskaia epigramma.[Moscow, 1960.]

REFERENCE

Iarkho, V., and K. Polonskaia. Antichnaia lirika. Moscow, 1967.

Anacreon

(563–478 B.C.) Greek lyric poet who idealized the pleasures of love. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Love

Anacreon

(563–478 B. C.) Greek lyric poet who praised the effects of wine. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Wine

Anacreon

?572--?488 bc, Greek lyric poet, noted for his short songs celebrating love and wine
References in periodicals archive ?
I then unearth how Moore's popularization of Anacreontics in ballad measures contributed to, but also made problematic, Victorian ideals of a "classical bard" at the origins of civilization.
Anacreontics were, like ballads, supposed to have been performed in social settings, and the English Anacreontic's formal similarities to ballad meter-that is, lines of three or, more often, four strong beats, usually of seven or eight syllables-made it easy to analogize them.
This book addresses a perplexing question provoked by the popularity of Anacreontic verse among poets of the late eighteenth-century Spanish Enlightenment: why would serious proponents of enlightened reform, who championed the virtue of social utility and civic sacrifice over individual desire, simultaneously and prodigiously produce such light, lyrical poetry dealing with love and wine?
The first, "La mascara de Anacreonte y la feminizacion del 'hombre de bien,' " discusses the Anacreontic tradition and the poets' use of a the voice of ah old, drunken man who expresses love for both young men and women.
Among the audiences who flocked to hear the notorious political lecturer in a new guise were a number of young women, the wives (and especially the daughters) of old radical friends, and it is to these young ladies that he addressed some ten or fifteen amatory odes written between 1803 and 1805, most of which are found in volume 2 of the manuscript, clustered before the anacreontics.
63) The anacreontics and paphiades (addressed, in transparent code, to another "Mary") fulfill and expand their ecstasy, with plentiful images of paphian flowers, opening buds, kindling .
Read in these larger contexts, "Wine of Cyprus" emerges as a strategic intervention in debates about Anacreontics at a pivotal juncture in the tradition's trajectory.
Anacreontics spouted up in diverse European languages in part because they embodied a lyric spontaneity and desire not found in Pindar's more formally elaborate commissioned odes celebrating "shining goals," to use EBB's words in "Wine of Cyprus" (1.
This is particularly noficeable in what is generally known as Rococo style, the first of the seventeenth century new literary trends, which at first was closely related to the Baroque but ended by meshing with the anacreontic and bucolic themes typical of neoclassicism (Rossich, "La literatura catalana").
Kaske shows how another of Spenser's works, the anacreontics, relates to Spenser's marriage hymn: the anacreontics provide 'some sort of bridge from sonnets to epithalamion' through the 'dramatization [of] the discomforts of the lover as fiance; all of them are expressions of sexual frustration which are portrayed as resolved in the Epithalamion'.
19 continues to be problematic, all the more since it is absolutely invariable, and even avoids any of the rational or irrational substitutions which are common both in the hemiambic and in the anacreontic Anacreontea (and also in the 'pherecratean' hemiambics quoted above, n.
Is it right to suppose that a poem by Bion might be so crucial a focus in an anacreontic author's mind as to let him use its incipit as an initial 'motto'?