anaerobic bacteria


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anaerobic bacteria

[¦an·ə¦rōb·ik ‚bak′tir·ē·ə]
(microbiology)
Any bacteria that can survive in the partial or complete absence of air; two types are facultative and obligate.
References in periodicals archive ?
in India, bile cultures for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were carried out on 125 samples from patients with chronic cholecystitis with cholelithiasis; 71 (56.8%) aerobic and 17 (13.6%) anaerobic bacteria were detected.
Anaerobic bacteria form a vast majority of commensal flora inhabiting different body sites and are the source of diverse infections.
Aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in subgingival and supragingival plaques of adult patients with periodontal disease.
Dr Katz says: "When tonsils are infected and inflamed, it makes it difficult for the anaerobic bacteria at the back of the tongue to break down chemicals as usual.
Oxygen inhibits the growth of the responsible anaerobic bacteria, so scraping off the film and using an oxidizing mouthwash will counter that problem.
Bacteroides fragilis are anaerobic bacteria found in the human gastrointestinal tract and often cause intra-abdominal infections.
(1.) Liu CM et al., Male circumcision significantly reduces prevalence and load of genital anaerobic bacteria, mBio, 2013, doi: 10.1128/mBio.00076-13, accessed April 24, 2013.
Antimicrobial resistance patterns for many anaerobic bacteria have changed significantly over the last several years, resulting in a lack of predictability for many species.
Pfister prospectively investigated 370 clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria over 6 months.
An increase in methylamine molecules in the exhaled breath can indicate that the patient has a liver or kidney problem; an increase in ammonia indicates renal failure; the presence of nitric acid and H2O2 indicate presence of asthma; a sweet fruity smell indicates the presence of ketone bodies; and a fishy odour indicates anaerobic bacteria in the lower urinary track.
Samples contained more than 40 distinct bacterial families, including aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Circumcision was associated with a significant change in the overall microbiota (p=0.007) and a significant decrease in anaerobic bacterial families (p=0.014).
Aerobic bacteria only were isolated in 43 patients (53%), anaerobic bacteria only in eight patients (9.9%), mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in 23 patients (28.4%).