Analects, The

Analects, The

emphasize human relationships, the golden rule, and usefulness to the state and society. [Chin. Lit.: The Analects of Confucius in Benét, 33]
References in periodicals archive ?
Contrastingly, in the Analects, the most reliable records of Confucius' own speeches, we can find that Confucius was not as religious as his contemporaries, and there is even certain dereligionizing tendency in Confucius' thought.
In the Analects, the most reliable record we have of the actual words of Confucius, tian is often consistent with the concept of God, or at least an all-powerful, morally directed, purposive, personal entity.
In Analects, the ultimate goal of the cultural and intellectual pursuits of a gentleman is to obtain virtue.
Confucius: Confucian analects, the great learning and the doctrine of the mean.
Ideally, according to the Analects, the older a person becomes, the
Drawing on the Analects, the writings of Zhu Xi [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1130-1200), and the work of contemporary Confucians like Feng Youlan and Tang Junyi, Weiming explains that in Confucianism "a genuine civil society is not an adversarial system but a fiduciary community.
References to Chinese texts--the Mengzi, the Analects, the Zhongyong (rendered as Maintaining Perfect Balance or (more commonly) as The Doctrine of the Mean--"will be by the traditional divisions of the texts into chapter and section.
"Prolegomena." Confucius: Confucian Analects, The Great Learning and The Doctrine of the Mean.
Apart from demonstrating provincial officials' familiarity with the Analects, the so-called Confucian tablet is the first artifact that supports a theory that the kokufu functioned before the establishment of a system of central autocracy in the seventh century.
The family underlies the state in the sense that a well-ordered state requires good "family values." But the Analects, the Great Learning, and The Doctrine of the Mean do not use the family as a model of the state.
Whereas according to the Analects, the Master said, "At 15 I set my heart on learning; at 30 I took my stand; at 40 I came to be free from doubts; at 50 I understood the Decree of Heaven; at 60 my ear was attuned; at 70 I followed my heart's desire without overstepping the line." (II/4)
Different from the dialogues of questions and answers between Confucius and his disciples in the Analects, the characteristic of midwifery is that the participants of the dialogues ask and answer questions concerning the same theme (3), in order to reveal the absurdity (4) and loopholes in people's daily beliefs, that is, "the derivation of something universal from the particular.