flashback

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flashback

a transition in a novel, film, etc., to an earlier scene or event

flashback

[′flash‚bak]
(civil engineering)

flashback

A reversal of flame in a system that is counter to the usual flow of the combustible mixture.
References in periodicals archive ?
John Henry's own death in the final section is another example of analepsis, absent in the now of the narrative and told retrospectively, only available to Frankie through the narrative of Berenice, who nurses him through his meningitis:
One of the novel's most significant and often-examined moments of analepsis recounts Granpa's childhood in 1867 when he witnessed Government Regulators murder a seemingly innocent family.
In one perspective, it is the text's center of gravity, the place toward which other events strain, either through prolepsis or analepsis.
The main forms are retrospection, or analepsis (the analeptic order of the events a,b,c would be c,b,a), and anticipation, or prolepsis (order of the events c,a,b).
The first two excerpts illustrate a case of substitution for a realized PLP, and the last one shows competition against PLP as an indicator of analepsis in narratives based on the SP/IMP pair.
Flashbacks would be trouble enough, even if Jones did not build analepsis within prolepsis, in Gerard Genette's terminology, and vice versa.
This narrative gap of 113 story years, filled as we are told later with tremendous social and moral transformation, is illuminated only by way of analepsis focalized through Dr.
La referencia al pasado se realiza a veces por analepsis y otras por observaciones del narrador intercaladas en la accion, como elementos que retardan pero a la vez profundizan el sentido de la trama.
Analepsis, 2004, is a silent montage of reestablishing shots and sequence shots from TV news programs; static takes, pans, zooms, and aerial shots pass in a strange parade, with no clues as to the stories the footage was meant to illustrate.
analepsis Any evocation after the fact of an event that took place earlier than the point in the story where we are at any given moment (ND, 40).