Anamorphic image

Anamorphic image

A distorted image that must be viewed in a special mirror in order to become recognizable.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
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"Subconsciously," he says, "we relate the look of an anamorphic image to big Hollywood films, [many of which] were shot on them.
And further, if Sarduy could see a relation between Kepler's theory of elliptical movement and Borromini's architectural designs, and between the Borrominian ellipse and the hidden code of the anamorphic image, it is only because for Sarduy the structuralist theorist, language, no less than the pictorial image, called not so much for a reading, as a deciphering.
RECODER: The unique thing about our intervention to the camera obscura, is the anamorphic image and the squeezed image, because there's no lens with the camera obscura--it's the lensless camera obscura.
Continuing the body theme, Boyle examines the two frontispieces that were created for Thomas Hobbes's Leviathan, noticing in the fair copy an anamorphic image. The crucial difference from the actual frontispiece is that the faces on the monarch's body peer out at the viewer.
Upon closer examination--or rather, keeping the image at a greater distance from the eyes--the viewer becomes aware that the primary plot material is used to construct a composite, slightly anamorphic image of Cervantes' head in which Don Quixote's shield makes up one of the author's bespectacled eyes, while the almost three-hundred-and-sixty degree curve in Rocinantes neck forms the other.
The instructions include directions for making an exact, mathematically correct anamorphic image that involves a mapping or correspondence between a cartesian and polar set of coordinates.
(This softness may relate to the Sony's ability to downmix an anamorphic image to letterbox form quite well, because the movies that were A/B compared were anamorphically squeezed.)
Only when the viewer moves to the side, almost up against the wall, does the anamorphic image of the landscape begin to appear.
One wonders whether it is entirely accurate when applied to the relationship between these specific texts: the anamorphic image is usually characterized as distorted and requires a shift in viewing position in order to be deciphered.
In the next proposition, 12, Faire une chaire en Perspective si difforme, qu'estant veue hors de son poinct, elle n'en air nulle aparence, Niceron shows how it is possible to use techniques of foreshortening to unnaturally elongate a chair and a bench.(56) Thus the same method that he used in the earlier book to foreshorten a chair [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 6 OMITTED] is employed to make an anamorphic image of a chair [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 7 OMITTED].
He includes illusions of depth and distance, inversions, vibration effects, tessellations, perspective illusions, anamorphic images, murals, camouflage, upside-down illusions, ambiguous figures and figure-ground illusions, neon and after-affects, color brightness, static movements, estimated sizes, image distortions, and geometric illusions, with examples from psychology, the popular press, the decorative arts, contemporary street art, and the fine arts, and artists like M.C.
In Italy, for example, the presence of anamorphic images and optical illusions in literature can be seen only from early 17th century on.