anarchy

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anarchy

1. Political theory general lawlessness and disorder, esp when thought to result from an absence or failure of government
2. the absence or lack of government
3. the theory or practice of political anarchism
References in periodicals archive ?
overcoming such disadvantages as a defending anarchist society might face requires vigilant, sizeable, well-rounded armed forces that rival the militaries of potential aggressors'.
The topic of education in an anarchist society is broached in Kropotkin's letter to Spanish libertarian and educational reformer Francisco Ferrer (pp 643-45).
Shevek uses the same logic of complementarity (that led to his theory of time) to solve his greatest problem, the seeming incompatibility of individual freedom and social responsibility within the anarchist society of Anarres.
And for the anarchists an independent Ukraine would have to be a revolutionary, anarchist society.
The second volume will discuss whether individualist anarchism is capitalistic, anarchist opposition to state socialism, and the outlines of anarchist society, among other topics.
1) Ward has summed his anarchist vision up in a succinct passage in his most important theoretical book, Anarchy in Action: `[t]he argument of this book is that an anarchist society, a society which organises itself without authority, is always in existence.
Much as I agree with the view that anarchists should not isolate themselves from popular struggles for the sake of some misconceived notions of ideological purity, at some point anarchists have to 'draw the line', as Thoreau and Paul Goodman did, and refuse to participate in political systems that have proven themselves completely incapable of creating any pathways to an anarchist society.
In an attempt to address what has been called a striking description of the seductions and snares of anarchist society, the contributors of these 16 articles analyze various aspects of its politics, including the open-ended utopian, post-consumerist, classic anarchist, temporal, and revolutionary, with individual essays' topics including the need for walls, self- reflexivity, ambiguity, pluralism and community, ecological political theory, Marcuse and the fate of utopia in the postmodern, and questions of individual and community.
Referencing the work of Jankel Adler and others, Woodcock developed a sophisticated analysis of violence, in which art could play both a destructive and constructive role in the creation of a 'natural' anarchist society.
22) Woodcock concludes that, in an anarchist society where all members have equal access to economic security, free education, and are unencumbered by 'restrictive law or custom', 'the number of artists produced will be proportionately higher'.
Reaching this conclusion, he continued that Berneri, with her 'innate realism' realised the necessity of turning to 'psychology and education' to further the libertarian ideal, but accepted that the actual achievement of an anarchist society was unlikely.
This presumes that such specialist positions will be preserved in a post-revolutionary anarchist society.