anarcho-syndicalism

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anarcho-syndicalism

a revolutionary movement derived, in part, from the teachings of Proudhon and MARX, and most usually associated with the doctrines of Guillaume and SOREL. The movement emerged in France in the 1890s and thereafter spread to Italy, Spain and Latin America. Anarcho-syndicalists were committed to the overthrow of capitalism by means of a workers’ revolution. Their doctrines were based on a radical rejection of all political roads to socialism, and indeed of all POLITICAL PARTIES, power and planning both before and after the revolution. Such ‘politics’ was associated with compromise which weakened the revolutionary will of the workers. It was also associated with hierarchical party and state organization, and thus with inequalities of power and domination, which would – unless politics was repudiated – persist after the revolution and convert the DICTATORSHIP OF THE PROLETARIAT into a dictatorship over the proletariat by party hierarchs and state functionaries. Accordingly, the anarcho-syndicalist ideal lay in a producer-centred revolution: a revolution carried out at the point of production by a loose federation of decentralized, free, autonomous workers’ organizations which is based on a rejection of hierarchy and domination and achieved through the medium of the general strike. This would sweep away capitalist society and the state and replace them with free, autonomous, self-governing workers’ associations which would administer production and society without recourse to hierarchical organization and domination. Although anarcho-syndicalism made some impact in France, Italy and Spain, its influence was short-lived and never widespread, especially since mainstream MARXISM regarded it as a PETTY BOURGEOIS deviation which distracted the working class from its principal task of building a revolutionary party
References in periodicals archive ?
In April of 1936, a few months before Spain's Civil War is set into motion by rebel members of the military in July, Sanchez Saornil and others formed Mujeres Libres, an anarcho-syndicalist group for women's liberation.
His involvement with groups of neighbourhood youths evolved into an anarcho-syndicalist militancy and lifelong commitment to the CNT.
In 1909/10, Marinetti undertook numerous attempts to gather the support of Anarcho-Syndicalist groups and associations and to forge a coalition between revolutionaries in both the political and aesthetic fields.
Whatever has occurred, I do not see any huge appetite for transforming our society into an anarcho-syndicalist Marxist co-operative, at least not from Terry who cut my hair this morning or Billy in the sandwich shop.
This leaves some aspects to be covered less than satisfactorily and even at times for errors to creep in, including an incorrect date for Germany's Spartacist uprising, the claim that Antonio Gramsci died in prison, and an anarcho-syndicalist poster from the Spanish Civil War that claims to be of communist origin.
The Unionist Guild was founded by Chinese influenced by the anarcho-syndicalist philosophy.
Apart from Borovoi, the collection featured a number of other well-known anarchists, chief among them Nettlau, who contributed a long exposition on Bakunin; Apollon Karelin, the populist veteran and anarcho-communist biographer of Bakunin who had died the previous March; Sazhin, who offered memoirs of Bakunin; Solonovich and Otverzhennyi, who had accompanied Borovoi at the anarchist meeting of 1 July; the "Soviet" anarcho-syndicalist Daniil Novomirskii, and others.
Now correct me if I am wrong, but isn't that an anarcho-syndicalist union?
Chomsky approvingly quotes the anarcho-syndicalist thinker Rudolf Rockers's statement to the effect that Anarchism is a tendency rather than a fixed system; one which attempts to provide for "the free unhindered unfolding of all the individual and social forces in life.
At this Jesuit school he received his first exposure to anarcho-syndicalist ideas from a professor who had his students read Proudhon on the sources of poverty.
The concluding essays by Claire Curtis and Avery Plaw reaffirm the skeptical or qualified nature of Le Guin's advocacy of anarcho-syndicalist values, and the ways in which her dialogic utopia "counters the passivity of both complacency and pessimism" (265).
A similar nostalgia for the local informs his early praise for the regionalist poetry of Edgar Lee Masters and Robert Frost, and it extends into his admiration for Mussolini's program of autarchia, designed (in theory, at least) to empower regional self-rule, a vestige of II Duce's (and Pea's) anarcho-syndicalist beginnings.