anarcho-syndicalism

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anarcho-syndicalism

a revolutionary movement derived, in part, from the teachings of Proudhon and MARX, and most usually associated with the doctrines of Guillaume and SOREL. The movement emerged in France in the 1890s and thereafter spread to Italy, Spain and Latin America. Anarcho-syndicalists were committed to the overthrow of capitalism by means of a workers’ revolution. Their doctrines were based on a radical rejection of all political roads to socialism, and indeed of all POLITICAL PARTIES, power and planning both before and after the revolution. Such ‘politics’ was associated with compromise which weakened the revolutionary will of the workers. It was also associated with hierarchical party and state organization, and thus with inequalities of power and domination, which would – unless politics was repudiated – persist after the revolution and convert the DICTATORSHIP OF THE PROLETARIAT into a dictatorship over the proletariat by party hierarchs and state functionaries. Accordingly, the anarcho-syndicalist ideal lay in a producer-centred revolution: a revolution carried out at the point of production by a loose federation of decentralized, free, autonomous workers’ organizations which is based on a rejection of hierarchy and domination and achieved through the medium of the general strike. This would sweep away capitalist society and the state and replace them with free, autonomous, self-governing workers’ associations which would administer production and society without recourse to hierarchical organization and domination. Although anarcho-syndicalism made some impact in France, Italy and Spain, its influence was short-lived and never widespread, especially since mainstream MARXISM regarded it as a PETTY BOURGEOIS deviation which distracted the working class from its principal task of building a revolutionary party
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, the Yucatecan camarillas--composed of surprising coalitions of conservatives and anarchosyndicalists, hacendados and communists--continued to be critical mediators between the state government and national institutions.
A central undertaking of Kelsey's book is to underscore the considerable regional variation in the anarchosyndicalist movement, whose inherently decentralized structure impaired co-ordination of national action through the C.N.T.
(23) As David Miller has commented: 'We can see in Spain the unique spectacle of a mass trade union movement being led along the revolutionary path by a minority of conscious anarchists--the original anarchosyndicalist strategy came to fruition'.
The first section provides a more traditional examination of urban political history, centered on the conflicts between Republican parties and anarchosyndicalist movements.
Pouget made the same anarchosyndicalist point in 1900: "The worker will only respect machinery on the day when it becomes his friend, shortening his work, rather than as today, his enemy, taking away jobs, killing workers ....
Although the title suggests that the volume will address the period from the Porfiriato to the North American Free Trade Agreement, extensive historical study of the anarchosyndicalist movement effectively ends in the second to the last chapter of the text.
As Patrick Renshaw indicates, the IWW's leading centralizers went into the Communist Party and supported the Third International, leaving a largely anarchosyndicalist leadership in the Wobblies.
Revolution Proletatienne in August 1926 therefore dismissed the anarchosyndicalist Besnard, the chief architect of the C.G.T.S.R., as an "apostle of schism."
Gottfried understands that a movement, and later a regime, could be reactionary and still appeal to workers, anarchosyndicalists, and even leftist Hegelian philosophers like Giovanni Gentile.
(75.) Barbara Mitchell, The Practical Revolutionaries; A New Interpretation of the French Anarchosyndicalists (Westport, 1977), 140.
In 1893 John Peter Altgeld, the reform Democratic Governor of Illinois, made a decision that ended his career: to pardon three anarchosyndicalists convicted on spurious grounds in the famous Haymarket bombing of 1886.
Until the early 1920s, anarchists and anarchosyndicalists dominated the labour movements of Brazil, with state-capture-minded socialists in a secondary role.