Anastasiia Verbitskaia

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Verbitskaia, Anastasiia Alekseevna

 

Born Feb. 10 (22), 1861, in Voronezh; died Jan. 16, 1928. Russian writer.

The principal themes of Verbitskaia’s topical but very superficial books are family life and interrelations between the sexes: the novella Discord (1887), the novels Vavochka (1898) and She Got Free (1899), the novella In a New Way (1902), and the play Whose Fault (1904). However, a certain protest is expressed in them against the abnormal upbringing of women in bourgeois-aristocratic society. In the novel Spirit of the Time (1908), she made an attempt at commenting on the events of 1905-07. In the later novels The Keys of Happiness (1909-13) and The Yoke of Love (1914-15), the problem of the emancipation of women is replaced by advocacy of “free” love and by sexual motifs, which made the novels popular primarily among bourgeois readers.

REFERENCES

Chukovskii, K. Kniga o sovremennykh pisateliakh. St. Petersburg [1914].
[“Stat’i o Verbitskoi i perepiska.”] In Ol’minskii, M. Po literaturnym voprosam. Moscow-Leningrad, 1932.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
When thinking about "serious" music and "fine art" it is useful to remember the point made trenchantly by Laura Engelstein decades ago: the boulevard was a site of cultural production that violated status, class, and gender distinctions; it was "by definition indiscriminate, [mixing] high and low in both thematic and stylistic terms." (11) Since Engelstein's seminal The Keys to Happiness: Sex and the Search For Modernity in Fin-de-Siecle Russia, the boulevard has appeared mainly as the playground of celebrities such as Anastasiia Verbitskaia or the meshchanstvo (middle-class philistines)--as a space of supposedly middlebrow cultural forms like variety theater, operetta, and cinema.
A wide range of literary genres are considered, from hagiographic writings, personal journals, and novellas to plays, novels, and poetry written by well-known authors (including, amongst others, Lidiia Ginzburg, Lidiia Zinov'eva-Annibal, Leonid Andreev, Daniil Kharms, Liudmila Petrushevskaia) and other writers, as yet little known or studied by Western critics (such as Anastasiia Verbitskaia, Tatiana Smertina, Tatiana Bek, Nina Iskrenko, Ol'ga Sedakova).