Anatolian Plateau


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Related to Anatolian Plateau: Asia Minor, Iranian plateau
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Anatolian Plateau

 

the inner part of the Asia Minor upland, located in Turkey. It is bounded on the north by the Pontic Mountains and on the south by the Taurus Mountains. The length of the plateau is about 700 km from east to west, and the width is up to 400 km from north to south. The plateau is composed mainly of sedimentary Paleogene and Neogene rocks. The large amount of volcanic activity is linked to Quaternary breaks. The extinct volcano Erciyas Dagi is 3,770 m high. The surface is predominantly leveled (elevations are 800–1,500 m), with insular ridges. Individual peaks rise to heights above 2,000 m. In the south there are a number of drainless depressions with salt bottoms and salt lakes—for example, Lake Tuz—and sloping plains with oases. The climate is subtropical-continental, and winters are cold. Precipitation varies from 200 mm in the center of the plateau to 350–500 mm a year on its borders, with the maximum falling in the spring. The northern half of the Anatolian Plateau is cut by the Kizil Irmak, Sakarya River, and others. The soils are gray and brown. The vegetation is of the arid steppe and semidesert type, with low, prickly, cushion-shaped shrubs. On the northern edge of the plateau is the city of Ankara.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Anatolian plateau was the solid centre of the Ottoman Empire, what the Turks called their true home.
Mitchell's account of the rise of the Church offers a range of new perspectives because it is the first synthesis to make use of much recent work on inscriptions from the Anatolian plateau, above all the ancient regions of Phrygia, Pisidia, and Lykaonia.
Anyone approaching the city from the drab Anatolian plateau is immediately struck by the immensity of "God's Mountain", at 2,327 metres the highest peak in western Anatolia, and the lushness of the surrounding vegetation.
The Akbash dog originated on the Anatolian Plateau where it is widely used as a guardian for sheep ("The Akbash Dog: Guardian of the Turkish Sheep Industry," p.
I reached eastern Turkey and the central Anatolian plateau in January and had to endure days when the temperature never rose above minus 5 [degree] Celsius.