Anatomy of Melancholy

Anatomy of Melancholy

lists causes, symptoms, and characteristics of melancholy. [Br. Lit.: Anatomy of Melancholy]
References in periodicals archive ?
What we call schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are recognizable in literature dating back to ancient Greece, and The Anatomy of Melancholy, published in 1621 by the English scholar Robert Burton, remains one of the most astute descriptions of depression.
This odist will have none of the pathology of "melancholy fits" indexed in Robert Burton's sublime treatise, The Anatomy of Melancholy, the very phrase appearing therein dozens of times.
Marsilio Ficino's (1433-1499) Three Books of Life, which deals with the health hazards of intellectual pursuits and Robert Burton's (1577-1640) widely read and highly influential The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621) are also especially important literary sources.
THE ANATOMY OF MELANCHOLY, Birmingham Rep, Today & Tomorrow, 0121 236 4455.
Thursday The Anatomy of Melancholy was the first selfhelp book, written 400 years ago.
The Anatomy of Melancholy was written in the 17th century by vicar Robert Burton, who attempted to identify the causes and cures for all kinds of melancholy and depression.
3) I will refer also to Robert Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621 to 1641), a work of breathtaking scope and bulk that enjoyed six editions during Burton's life and a definitive posthumous edition.
Not only do early modern medical texts, including Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy and Thomas Geminus's reproduction of Vesalius's Epitome present blood as central to the healthy functioning of both body and state, they emphasize both its unifying properties and its ability to connect body and soul as sources of identity.
His book Anatomy of Melancholy (1621) was written from his own experiences with the condition (Cook, 1981).
Tracing descriptions of depression from Job in the Bible to Robert Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy (1620), pharmacologists Cryan (U.
8) Suffice it to say that, by the time Hilliard painted his lovesick swain, melancholy--particularly love melancholy--claimed the attention of several theorists, most notably Jacques Ferrand (Erotomania), Andre du Laurens (A discourse on the preservation of the sight), and Robert Burton, whose famous three-volume Anatomy of Melancholy was issued in 1621.
A The earliest written record of the phrase being used is Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy of 1621, in the form "Set a beggar on horseback, and he will ride a gallop".