Anatomy of Melancholy

Anatomy of Melancholy

lists causes, symptoms, and characteristics of melancholy. [Br. Lit.: Anatomy of Melancholy]
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Three chapters are devoted to Shakespeare (Love's Labours Lost, Merchant of Venice, Hamlet), one to Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, and one to Samson Agonistes.
The contributions that make up the main body of the text are devoted to a wide variety of related subjects, including Orientalism and utopian intellectual history in Robert BurtonAEs The Anatomy of Melancholy, the Student-Interpreters Corps and the United StatesAE understanding of Asia, 1902-1941, Ha JinAEs The Crazed and Nanjing Requiem, and others.
What we call schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are recognizable in literature dating back to ancient Greece, and The Anatomy of Melancholy, published in 1621 by the English scholar Robert Burton, remains one of the most astute descriptions of depression.
This odist will have none of the pathology of "melancholy fits" indexed in Robert Burton's sublime treatise, The Anatomy of Melancholy, the very phrase appearing therein dozens of times.
Marsilio Ficino's (1433-1499) Three Books of Life, which deals with the health hazards of intellectual pursuits and Robert Burton's (1577-1640) widely read and highly influential The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621) are also especially important literary sources.
THE ANATOMY OF MELANCHOLY, Birmingham Rep, Today & Tomorrow, 0121 236 4455.
Thursday The Anatomy of Melancholy was the first selfhelp book, written 400 years ago.
The Anatomy of Melancholy was written in the 17th century by vicar Robert Burton, who attempted to identify the causes and cures for all kinds of melancholy and depression.
3) I will refer also to Robert Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621 to 1641), a work of breathtaking scope and bulk that enjoyed six editions during Burton's life and a definitive posthumous edition.
books include Anatomy of Melancholy & Other Poems (Penguin, 2013)
All poets are mad," averred Robert Burton in his 1621 book, The Anatomy of Melancholy (1875: 71), depicting with empathy the bonds between melancholy, madness, and suicide and arguing for compassion for those who were in such anguish and despair as to kill themselves.
Not only do early modern medical texts, including Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy and Thomas Geminus's reproduction of Vesalius's Epitome present blood as central to the healthy functioning of both body and state, they emphasize both its unifying properties and its ability to connect body and soul as sources of identity.