Anaximander


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Anaximander

(ənăk'sĭmăn`dər), c.611–c.547 B.C., Greek philosopher, b. Miletus; pupil of ThalesThales
, c.636–c.546 B.C., pre-Socratic Greek philosopher of Miletus and reputed founder of the Milesian school of philosophy. He is the first recorded Western philosopher. Thales taught that everything in nature is composed of one basic stuff, which he thought to be water.
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. He made the first attempt to offer a detailed explanation of all aspects of nature. Anaximander argued that since there are so many different sorts of things, they must all have originated from something less differentiated than water, and this primary source, the boundless or the indefinite (apeiron), had always existed, filled all space, and, by its constant motion, separated opposites out from itself, e.g., hot and cold, moist and dry. These opposites interact by encroaching on one another and thus repay one another's "injustice." The result is a plurality of worlds that successively decay and return to the indefinite. The notion of the indefinite and its processes prefigured the later conception of the indestructibility of matter. Anaximander also had a theory of the relation of earth to the heavenly bodies, important in the history of astronomy. His view that man achieved his physical state by adaptation to environment, that life had evolved from moisture, and that man developed from fish, anticipates the theory of evolution.

Bibliography

See studies by P. Selegman (1974), C. H. Kahn (3d ed. 1994), and C. Rovelli (tr. 2011).

Anaximander

611--547 bc, Greek philosopher, astronomer, and mathematician who believed the first principle of the world to be the Infinite
References in periodicals archive ?
This should have been particularly embarrassing since it was well before Anaxagoras that Anaximander had made "the first known application of the Principle of Sufficient Reason" in explaining why Earth was at rest in the centre of the cosmos (40; for a sample of the history of this position, see Barnes 1979: 24, Hussey 1972: 26, Jaeger 1967: 36, Burnet 1930: 65-66, and Gomperz 1901: 51).
We might also point out that classical scholars such as Anaximander, Hecataeus, and Heraclitus devoted themselves freely to their studies although they were subjects of the Great King.
30) His student Anaximander did have an elaborate theory of the heavens, including a theory of eclipses.
A: The Greek philosopher Anaximander (uh-NAK-suh-MAN-der), who lived in the 6th century B.
In so doing, I will argue that (1) Voegelin downplays the central symbol of the Anaximander fragment, which is cosmic justice, and (2) fails to appreciate how the Fall fundamentally shifted the balance within the metaxy; and thus, (3) for him, restriking the balance of consciousness is not nearly as radical an undertaking as described by Augustine (and St.
His thought, for all of its reliance on certain of the insights of idealism, returned philosophy at a new and more scientific level to the work of observation begun by the Ionian or Milesian philosophers, Thales, Anaximander, and Anaximenes.
A theory of all-pervasive Soul would bear comparison with theories like those in which Anaximander opposes tangible phenomena to the Indefinite, Anaximenes opposes them to Air, Anaxagoras to Mind, and so on.
It is rather with the famous dike fragment of Anaximander (A9, B1 DK) that we first see the idea of nature as a dynamic equilibrium between opposites, particularly as reflected in the elements: if one element or quality exists in superabundance, it must pay "justice" to its opposite in a perpetual cycle of readjustment.
Allers, Rudolf "Microcosmus: From Anaximander to Paracelsus.
One does not trace the givenness of Being to an endless series of messages, Seinsgeschicke, which, in the West at least, began with Anaximander.
With regards to Miletus, its pioneering scholars deserve some mentionHomer (the poet), Thales (the contemporary of Solon and Croesus), Anaximander (student of Thales), Anaximander (was believed to be the third, and last of the Miletus philosophers, considered a junior associate of Anaximander).
Thinkers such as Anaximander, Heraclitus, Pythagoras, Empedocles, and Xenophanes all rely on a model of binary opposites--light and dark, wet and dry, even and odd, happiness and unhappiness, life and death, straight and crooked, and so on--that continually transform the world through some sort of struggle between contraries.