Ancient Mariner

Ancient Mariner

cursed by the crew because his slaying of the albatross is causing their deaths. [Br. Poetry: Coleridge The Rime of the Ancient Mariner]
See: Curse

Ancient Mariner

telling his tale is penance for his guilt. [Br. Poetry: Coleridge “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”]

Ancient Mariner

he and his crew nearly die of thirst. [Br. Poetry: Coleridge The Ancient Mariner]
See: Thirst

Ancient Mariner

Coleridge’s wandering sailor. [Br. Lit.: “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” in Norton, 597–610]
References in classic literature ?
Plenty for all," the Ancient Mariner startled Daughtry by cackling shrilly.
Oodles and oodles of it, gold and gold and better than gold, in cask and chest, in cask and chest, a fathom under the sand," the Ancient Mariner assured him in beneficent cackles.
Eighteen days in the longboat," the Ancient Mariner shrilled, to Daughtry's startlement.
Sea stewards put on some style, I must say," commented the wheat- farmer, oblivious to the Ancient Mariner, who still declaimed of the heat of the longboat.
Hold your horses," the wheat-farmer said, with a flare of irritation, directed, not at the Ancient Mariner, but at the captain and the Jew.
In this book there was published the poem which of all that Coleridge write is the best known, The Ancient Mariner.
Then on they gladly sailed, the albatross following, until one day the Ancient Mariner, in a mad moment, shot the beautiful bird.
People did not understand The Ancient Mariner, and they laughed at Wordsworth's simple lyrics, although the last poem in the book, Tintern Abbey, has since become famous, and is acknowledged as one of the treasures of our literature.
Expressly in order to be near him, Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy soon leased the neighboring manor-house of Alfoxden, and there followed the memorable year of intellectual and emotional stimulus when Coleridge's genius suddenly expanded into short-lived but wonderful activity and he wrote most of his few great poems, 'The Ancient Mariner,'
Almost every one has felt the weird charm of 'The Ancient Mariner,' where all the unearthly story centers about a moral and religious idea, and where we are dazzled by a constant succession of such pictures as these:
Lykins against an iron fence, buttonholed him, fastened him with his eye, like the Ancient Mariner, and proceeded to unfold his narrative as placidly and peacefully as if we were all stretched comfortably in a blossomy summer meadow instead of being persecuted by a wintry midnight tempest:
pensive and alone, coming out of a little door opening into the wood, and walking on the beach in the setting sun, without even attracting the attention of the fishermen, who, on their return in the evening, drew, like the ancient mariners of the Archipelago, their barks up upon the sand of the shore.