Ancient Murrelet


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Ancient Murrelet

 

(Synthliboramphus antiquus), a bird of the family Alcidae of the order Charadriiformes. The ancient murrelet is about 25 cm long and weighs about 200 g. The back is gray, the head is black with a white stripe, and the underside is white. The bird is common along the coasts and on the islands of the north Pacific Ocean. In the USSR it is distributed from Kamchatka and the Komandorskie Islands to the northern part of Primor’e Krai and, possibly, Sakhalin. The ancient murrelet migrates south in winter to Japan and California. Nesting occurs on coastal cliffs; two eggs are laid, customarily in crevices or under stones. The diet consists of small marine invertebrates. A related species, S. wumizusume, nests in Japan and is occasionally encountered along the coasts of the USSR.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
They were also chosen because the Haida had long known these islands as important ancient murrelet sites, says Chris Gill, program director of Coastal Conversation, the group that supported Gwaii Haanas staff in planning and implementing the project.
Similarly, nearly three centuries of invasion by rats--believed to have first hitched rides over on fur traders' ships in the late 1700s--have severely impacted populations of ground-nesting seabirds like Cassin's auklets, fork-tailed storm petrels, rhinoceros auklets, and ancient murrelets.
Non-breeders may visit colonies later in the season and for several years prior to breeding, as reported for Ancient Murrelet (Synthliboramphus antiquus) (Gaston 1992) and Common Murre (Uria aalge), in which subadults tend to arrive earlier at the colony as they become older, and some subadults visit non-natal colonies prior to returning to their natal colony to breed (Halley and Harris 1993; Halley and others 1995).
This would be an even greater addition than the Ancient Murrelet which had landed on Lundy a few years back, they said.
Ancient Murrelet Synthliboramphus antiquus: This species is a rare but regular visitor in the northern Bering Sea.
The Ancient Murrelet (Synthliboramphus antiquus), the 5th species, still nests on Langara Island, but in greatly reduced numbers (Rodway and others 1994; Bertram 1995; Regehr and others 2007; Major and Jones 2011).
An adult Ancient Murrelet beached in September 1976 (Alaska Peninsula) and a probable second-year murrelet beached in July 1987 (Oregon) were synchronously molting remiges.
Results of a study of breeding and feeding ecology of the Ancient Murrelet, involving individuals collected on gathering grounds from 6 May to 10 July 1970 and 17 March to 9 August 1971, in the vicinity of Langara Island, Haida Gwaii, British Columbia (Sealy 1972, 1975a, 1976), shed light on the seasonal pattern of visitation by breeders and non-breeders on the gathering grounds.
Key words: Ancient Murrelet, British Columbia, family groups, movements, post-hatching dispersal, rearing areas, surveys, Synthliboramphus antiquus
Key words: Ancient Murrelet, family groups, movements, post-hatching dispersal, rearing areas, surveys, Synthliboramphus antiquus
Vagrancy in certain Pacific alcids, especially the Ancient Murrelet (Synthliboramphus antiquus) and Long-billed Murrelet (B.
Earliest records for each species were: Ancient Murrelet (Synthliboramphus antiquus) at St Lazaria Island, SEAK, in 1866; Cassin's Auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus) at Forrester Island, SEAK, in 1897; Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata) at Pine Island, BC, in 1860; and Tufted Puffin (Fratercula cirrhata) at Mandarte Island, BC, in 1858.