Andamanese

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Andamanese

 

the indigenous population of the Andaman Islands. Exact number unknown; according to some data, several hundred. They speak Andamanese languages.

The Andamanese are dwarfs (average height of men, 148 cm; of women, 138 cm). They belong to the Negritoid anthropological type. According to Indian census data of 1931, there are two surviving groups of tribes (the Jarawa and the Onge), which are divided into exogamous groups. The occupations of the Andamanese are hunting, foraging, and fishing. The religion of the Andamanese is characterized by worship of spirits of nature.

REFERENCES

Mochamed, C. M. “Andaman and Nicobar on the March.” March of India, 1958, nos. 4–5.

N. R. GUSEVA

References in periodicals archive ?
This myth was further elucidated by the Puchikwar group of Andaman Islanders interviewed by Radcliffe-Brown (1909: 261-2).
However, as Tolloko-tima is a mythical place, it need not necessarily have been identified with Barren Island; rather, it was probably regarded by the Andaman Islanders as the general direction from which both the northeast monsoon and the source of fire derived.
Today, the Jarawa (numbering only about 200 individuals) are among the few surviving groups of Andaman Islanders.
However, it is possible that the sample is of the tree Canarium euphyllum, the resin of which is used by the Andaman Islanders to make torches.
This site, in no way connected with legends or myths concerning the origins of the Andaman Islanders, has been dated to 2280|+ or -~90 b.
Our studies have led us to hypothesize that, perhaps 2000 years ago, the Andaman Islanders acquired the knowledge of pottery-making through trade or barter with the Nicobarese (Cooper & Raghavan 1989).
The archaeological data does not substantiate the myth which identifies Wot-a-emi as the place that is associated with the origins of the Andaman Islanders.
The clues afforded by the Andaman origin myth, even if they have led to negative results, help in bringing specific archaeological problems, such as the origins of the Andaman Islanders, into sharper focus.