Spectacled Bear

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Related to Andean Bear: Spectacled Bear

Spectacled Bear

 

(Tremarctos ornatus,) a predacious mammal of the family Ursidae. The body length is 150–180 cm, the tail length 7–10 cm, and the shoulder height 75–80 cm. The weight is 70–140 kg. The fur is coal black or brownish black. The eyes are surrounded by white or yellowish rings, which are connected by a white semicircle on the throat. The snout is shorter than that of other bears. Spectacled bears have a life-span of approximately 20 years. They are found only in South America, where they are encountered in mountain forests at elevations to 3,000 m and, occasionally, in lowland savannas and thickets. The bears feed primarily on grass shoots, fruits, and rhizomes; occasionally they attack deer, guanacos, and vicuñas.

References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Phoenix Zoo, Andean bear cubs' genitalia are highly undeveloped before age 2, making it very difficult to determine gender.
You can "adopt" an Andean bear by phoning 028 90782085 or visiting www.
Andean bears such as Spook, who lives at the zoo with his dad Omero, are also known as spectacled bears because of their eye markings.
Professor Bruford explained most bears eat a varied diet of both meat and vegetarian food, but the panda and the Andean bear have limited themselves to plants.
The indigenous peoples' veneration of the Andean bear and the belief in its supernatural powers were not shared by the conquering Spaniards, however.
These pilgrims took the ice from the condemned souls, and as they did so, recognized the Andean bear as a link between the world of the living and the spirit world.
Latest predictions are that not a single Andean bear, tiger or orang- utan will be found on earth in 20 years.
The latest predictions show that not a single Andean bear, tiger or orangutan will be around in 20 years.
It is home to orchids, Andean bears and cocks-of-the-rock, as well as archaeological sites like the enigma of Kuelap, the citadel built between the Andes and the jungle, and mysterious tombs and sarcophagi, the legacy of the Chachapoya culture that once reigned here.
The expansion will include several projects and upgrades, including a new entry plaza, new exhibits featuring Andean bears and spider monkeys and a state-of-the-art veterinary hospital.
The lions have wet moats, primates and outdoor birds get shade and mist, jaguars and Andean bears have swimming pools.