Andersonville National Historic Site


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Andersonville National Historic Site

Address:496 Cemetery Rd
Andersonville, GA 31711

Phone:229-924-0343
Fax:229-928-9640
Web: www.nps.gov/ande/
Size: 515 acres.
Established: Authorized on October 16, 1970.
Location:10 miles north of Americus, Georgia, on GA 49.
Facilities:Picnic area, rest rooms (é), visitor center (é), museum/exhibit, self-guided tour/trail, primitive campsite (available at no charge to educational and scout groups).
Activities:Guided tour, audio driving tour.
Special Features:Andersonville, or Camp Sumter as it was officially known, was one of the largest of many Confederate military prisons established during the Civil War. During the 14 months of its existence (1864-1865), more than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined here, of which nearly 13,000 died from disease, poor sanitation, malnutrition, overcrowding, or exposure to the elements. Today, Andersonville is the only park in the National Park System to serve as a memorial to all American prisoners of war throughout the nation's history. The park also features the National Prisoners of War Museum and Andersonville National Cemetery.

See other parks in Georgia.
References in periodicals archive ?
An interpretive park ranger at six national parks since 1995, Eric Leonard is currently serving as chief of interpretation and education at Andersonville National Historic Site.
After reading about Andersonville National Historic Site [September/ October 1998], I thought NPCA members would like to know that there were American POWs before there was a United States of America.
This past spring, the Park Service fulfilled the mission of Andersonville National Historic Site, one of the most notorious prisoner of war camps in U.S.
At one point an objection was raised to a sentence in a museum text about American prisoners who collaborated with North Korea, says Fred Boyles, superintendent of the Andersonville National Historic Site (and the Jimmy Carter National Historic Site in Plains, 22 miles away).
Is not Andersonville National Historic Site, a prison camp that held Federal soldiers during the Civil War, a place at which one can weep only bitter tears of shame for what people have done to each other?