Andrei Nikolaevich Beketov

Beketov, Andrei Nikolaevich

 

Born Nov. 26 (Dec. 8), 1825, in Novaia Beketovka, Penza Province; died July 1 (14), 1902, near Moscow. Russian botanist-morphologist and botanico-geographer.

In 1849, Beketov graduated from the University of Kazan. From 1863 to 1897 he was a professor at the University of St. Petersburg, and from 1895 he was an honorary member of the St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences. Together with Kh. Ya. Gobi he organized the first Russian scientific botanical journal, Botanicheskie zapiski (1886), and was one of the founders of the St. Petersburg Society of Naturalists. He studied the principles of the structures of the vegetative surface organs of plants (doctoral dissertation On the Morphologic Relations of Leafy Parts Among Themselves and With the Stalk, 1858) and of blossom deformities, clarifying their morphologic nature. Almost simultaneously with the publication of C. Darwin’s Origin of the Species but independently of it, Beketov explained the expediency of the arrangement of organic forms from the standpoint of natural science. Besides studies in floristics (“On Arkhangel’sk Flora,” 1884, and others), Beketov clarified the causes of the treelessness of the steppes; he was the first to establish a “presteppe” zone (forest steppe). Beketov created a school of Russian botanico-geographers. He was the author of the first textbook on the geography of plants, Geografiia rastenii (1896).

WORKS

Kurs botaniki: Morfologiia, sistematika i geograficheskoe raspredelenie semeistv. ... St. Petersburg, 1889.
Uchebnik botaniki, 2nd ed. St. Petersburg, 1897.

REFERENCES

“Torzhestvennoe sobranie imp. SPB Obshchestva estestvoispytatelei 26 noiabria 1902 goda, posviashchennoe pamiati A. N. Beketova.” Tr. SPB obshchestva estestvoispytatelei, 1903, vol. 33, issue 1.
Russkie botaniki: Biografo-bibliograficheskii slovar’, vol. 1. Moscow, 1947. Compiled by S. Iu. Lipshits.
References in classic literature ?
That is very true, and, therefore, I do not know whether, upon the whole, it would not be more advisable to do something for their mother while she lives, rather than for them--something of the annuity kind I mean.
Fairfax, the housekeeper, away to her friends at a distance; but he did it handsomely, for he settled an annuity on her for life: and she deserved it--she was a very good woman.
David had bought an annuity for himself with his money, I know,' said she, by and by.
From the time of his settling in Alencon he had nobly admitted his poverty, saying that his whole fortune consisted in an annuity of six hundred francs a year, the sole remains of his former opulence,--a property which obliged him to see his man of business (who held the annuity papers) quarterly.
I had often heard him complain of the disproportion of his rank with his fortune; and I advised him to invest all he had in an annuity.
She is not rich; she has only an annuity of twelve hundred francs, and it would be impossible for her to send me to school.
the House had never been their own and their Fortune had only been an Annuity on their own Lives.
Jellyby, they were going to have their secretary's portrait painted and presented to his mother-in-law, whose deep devotion to him was well known, they were going to get up everything, I really believe, from five hundred thousand tracts to an annuity and from a marble monument to a silver tea-pot.
But I shall not give up my Liberty for a dirty annuity.
But she refused, saying she could now afford to employ an assistant, and would continue the school till she could purchase an annuity sufficient to maintain her in comfortable lodgings; and, meantime, she would spend her vacations alternately with us and your sister, and should be quite contented if you were happy.
It would have been worth a small annuity to have beheld that; let alone Miss Price's evident joy at making them jealous, and Nicholas Nickleby's happy unconsciousness of making anybody uncomfortable.
There were fortunes for the staff that never cost France a penny, and the Legion of Honor was as good as an annuity for the rank and file; I still draw my pension on the strength of it.