Andros, Sir Edmund

Andros, Sir Edmund

(ăn`drŏs), 1637–1714, British colonial governor in America, b. Guernsey. As governor of New York (1674–81) he was bitterly criticized for his high-handed methods, and he was embroiled in disputes over boundaries and duties (see New JerseyNew Jersey,
Middle Atlantic state of the E United States. It is bordered by New York State (N and, across the Hudson River and New York Harbor, E), the Atlantic Ocean (E), Delaware, across Delaware Bay and River (SW), and Pennsylvania, across the Delaware River (W).
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), going so far as to arrest Philip CarteretCarteret, Philip,
1639–82, first colonial governor of New Jersey. Carteret, commissioned by the proprietor, Sir George Carteret, his fourth cousin, arrived in the province in 1665.
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. When James II, partly influenced by Edward RandolphRandolph, Edward,
c.1632–1703, English colonial agent in America. In 1676 he carried royal instructions to Massachusetts Bay that required the colony to send representatives to England to satisfy complaints of the heirs of John Mason (1586–1635) and Sir Ferdinando
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, consolidated all the New England colonies into the Dominion of New England, he named (1686) Andros governor. In 1688, New York and the Jerseys were also put under his control. The suppression of charters and colonial assemblies, interference with local customs and rights, and Andros's overbearing ways caused intense friction. After news of the overthrow of James II in 1688 reached the colonies, the colonials in Boston rebelled (1689), seized Andros and other officials, and sent them to England as prisoners. He was soon released and later was governor of Virginia (1692–97) and governor of Guernsey (1704–6).

Bibliography

See V. F. Barnes, Dominion of New England (1923).

Andros, Sir Edmund

(1637–1714) colonial governor; born in London, England. He became governor of the newly created Dominion of New England (including Massachusetts, Plymouth, Maine, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Hampshire) in 1686. His aristocratic manner and Anglican sympathies alienated the Bostonians and he was overthrown in a citizens' revolt in 1689.