Squatina

(redirected from Angel sharks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Squatina

 

(monkfish, or angel sharks), the only genus of the family Squatinidae. Monkfish resemble rays in that they have extremely flattened bodies; large, broad pectoral fins; and eyes on the upper part of the head. This resemblance may be explained by the fishes’ similar ways of life. The gill slits, as in all sharks, are on the sides of the body, in front of the pectoral fins. There are 11 species, distributed in moderately warm and subtropical waters of all oceans. Monkfish are not encountered in the tropics. They live on the sea bottom, often in shallows, and sometimes burrow into the sand. The largest species is Squatina squatina, which is up to 2.4 m long and weighs up to 72 kg. Other species are considerably smaller (0.6-1.5 m.). Monkfish feed on small benthic fishes, sea urchins, mollusks, and crabs. They are viviparous and bear ten to 25 young. The commercial value of monkfish is minor.

References in periodicals archive ?
They are now embarking on a roadshow to try to gather as much information from the public to unlock the mystery of Angel sharks here.
Despite their previous abundance, the angel shark was thought to only be spotted reliably around the Canary Islands.
ANGEL SHARK TODAY: Llyn Maritime FRIDAY-SATURDAY National Library of MONDAY 4-TUESDAY Sea Cadets, | Visit more information In an effort to get a better idea of their behaviour and population in Wales, the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and Natural Resources Wales launched the Angel Shark Project: Wales in July 2018, aiming to encourage people to report all sightings of the creatures.
Wales, Aberystwyth 5 MARCH: Holyhead zsl.org for "Even if people haven't ever heard of an Angel shark, we'd love them to come along and tell us about the local area - changes in local industry, fishing practices or infrastructure could all help us to fill in the blanks of the Angel shark's history and create the best plan of action to safeguard them into the future."
Angel sharks 538 77,507 Urophycis Brazilian 13,950 2,422,666 brasiliensis codling Urophycis mysiacea Gulf hake -- 78,446 Umbrina canosai Argentine 104,360 3,484,841 croaker -- Sharks 18,000 107,566 -- Small sharks 9,220 248,682 -- Skate 200 12,475 -- Mixed 15,280 144,325 species Total 261,174 12,505,984 Scientific names Common name Types of netting (mesh size mm) 110 120 Cynoscion leiarchus Smooth -- -- weakfish Cynoscion guatucupa Striped 18,420 10,060 weakfish Chaceon spp.
In Group 2, the angel shark showed the highest contribution (18.2%), followed by skates (i.e., several species of Rajidae) (14.4%) and monkfish (10.9%).
This is the first time an angel shark has given birth in captivity in the UK and, according to zoologists it is also a world first.
Further, this kind of information may facilitate the understanding of population dynamics of species with conservation priorities such as angel sharks, narrownose smoothhound shark and tope shark.
These fisheries operate on a multispecies basis (i.e., more than 20 species), targeting mainly narrownose smooth-hound shark Mustelus spp., tope shark Galeorhinus galeus, angel shark Squatina spp., rays Sympterygia spp., Atlantoraja spp.
Species Captures Weight (kg) Atlantic sharpnose 4,197 5,199 Bonnethead 830 1,519 Smooth dogfish, Mustelus canis 134 344 Florida smoothhound, Mustelus norrisi 121 291 Carcharhinidae 85 99 Blacknose 81 226 Angel shark 59 159 Carcharhinus sp.
Aspects of the age, growth and reproduction of the Pacific angel shark, Squatina californica, off Santa Barbara, California.
Angel sharks have never successfully been bred in captivity in the UK but aquarium chiefs are still hoping that Angelis and Anne will get it together.