flight deck

(redirected from Angled flight deck)
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flight deck

1. the crew compartment in an airliner
2. the upper deck of an aircraft carrier from which aircraft take off and on which they land

flight deck

[′flīt ‚dek]
(aerospace engineering)
In certain airplanes, an elevated compartment occupied by the crew for operating the airplane in flight.
(naval architecture)
The topmost complete deck of an aircraft carrier, used mainly for takeoff and landing of planes.

flight deck

flight deckclick for a larger image
i. The upper deck of an aircraft carrier that serves as a runway.
ii. The compartment in which all the flight, engine, systems, communications, and navigation are located. It also houses the flight crew.
iii. The compartment occupied by the aircrew in a transport or bomber aircraft.
References in periodicals archive ?
The British also helped develop angled flight decks, steam catapults and arresting gear.
The Indian ship will operate twelve MiG-29 mixed role aircraft and half-a-dozen 'Helix' and, like the Admiral Kuznetsov, will feature an angled flight deck with arrester wires to recover the fixed-wing aircraft.
Boddington, who was head of the naval aircraft department at Farnborough, is remembered for the development of the angled flight deck on aircraft carriers, the most important advance in aircraft carrier design since the end of the Second World War.
In late 2006, Andrew Marshall, the Director of the Office of Net Assessment in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, asked us to answer several questions: Why had the Royal Navy (RN) developed the angled flight deck, steam catapult, and optical landing aid before the U.
ACCORDING to the book "80 Years of the British Aircraft Carrier" by Frank Ott and Maurice Biggs, trials of an angled flight deck were conducted on HMS Triumph but HMS Centaur was the first carrier to be formally equipped with this development.
The Ark Royal and Eagle were both fitted with angled flight decks, that is true, however HMS Triumph, one of the many light fleet carriers of the Colossus class, commissioned between May 1944 and 1948, was the first Royal Navy ship to be trialled with an angled flight deck in 1951 and the Americans followed suit in 1952 with the USS Midway.
I served on HMS Eagle and joined her at Devonport in September 1954 where she was in dry dock being fitted with the new angled flight deck.