flight deck

(redirected from Angled flight deck)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

flight deck

1. the crew compartment in an airliner
2. the upper deck of an aircraft carrier from which aircraft take off and on which they land
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

flight deck

[′flīt ‚dek]
(aerospace engineering)
In certain airplanes, an elevated compartment occupied by the crew for operating the airplane in flight.
(naval architecture)
The topmost complete deck of an aircraft carrier, used mainly for takeoff and landing of planes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flight deck

flight deckclick for a larger image
i. The upper deck of an aircraft carrier that serves as a runway.
ii. The compartment in which all the flight, engine, systems, communications, and navigation are located. It also houses the flight crew.
iii. The compartment occupied by the aircrew in a transport or bomber aircraft.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Angled flight decks allow for more catapult installations and for simultaneous landings but the aircraft require an arrester system of shipborne lines with an aircraft tail hook to restrict movement once landed, and these 'controlled crashes' reduce airframe life.
Boddington, who was head of the naval aircraft department at Farnborough, is remembered for the development of the angled flight deck on aircraft carriers, the most important advance in aircraft carrier design since the end of the Second World War.
We set sail again and spent a year in the Mediterranean on exercises with the new angled flight deck and returned in July 1955 to Greenock, Scotland.
The correct image is that of the Audacious-class aircraft carrier, the fourth to carry the name of Ark Royal and the first ship in the world to carry an angled flight deck.
The British also helped develop angled flight decks, steam catapults and arresting gear.
He describes the technological achievements of the Royal Navy, such as angled flight decks, mirror deck landing systems, and vertical take-off and landing; operational successes during the two World Wars, including the sinking of the German light cruiser Konigsberg, the attack on the Italian fleet at Taranto, and Arctic and Atlantic convoy protection and operations with the US Navy in the Pacific; and post-war events like the Suez Campaign of 1956 and the recapture of the Falklands after the Argentine invasion, as well as operations in the Gulf.
Before the days of modern angled flight decks, a carrier flight deck could be doing only one of three things: spotting aircraft, launching aircraft, or recovering aircraft.