Anglo-Catholicism


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Anglo-Catholicism

 

a movement within the Anglican Church for the return to Catholicism, but without merging with the Roman Catholic Church. It began on the eve of the English Bourgeois Revolution in the 17th century as an anti-Puritan movement; it reappeared in the so-called Oxford movement of the 1830’s and 1840’s. Anglo-Catholicism opposes religious modernism and state intervention in the affairs of the church. The Anglo-Catholics are the most conservative group of Anglicans, with many supporters among the English aristocracy.

References in periodicals archive ?
These two sections are invaluable and combined with the analysis of Anglo-Catholicism make this a first-rate study which should become essential reading for anyone seeking a real understanding of this great poet and playwright.
There was a dedication of the self which was verbalized in terms of personal attachment to the Saviour, within the disciplines of contemporary Anglo-Catholicism." He also sees Rossetti's "abnegation of worldly things" as springing from "the sense of numinous awe which the Oxford movement had restored to matter-of-fact Christianity" rather than from "a Puritan retreat with refusal to see good in anything material." (6) Following Chapman, Diane Apostolos-Cappodona devotes a brief section of her article "Oxford and the Pre-Raphaelites from the Perspective of Nature and Symbol" (1981) to Rossetti.
Historically constituted by three competing streams of theology and piety--Evangelicalism, Anglo-Catholicism and Modernism--the Episcopal and Canadian Anglican churches were known for sustaining uneasy alliances.
Some of the best work on Newman and the Oxford Movement over the past two decades has dealt with the internal contradictions of sexuality, a project that goes back to David Hilliard's 1982 article, "Unenglish and Unmanly: Anglo-Catholicism and Homosexuality" and that is explored beautifully by Oliver S.
They think that Anglo-Catholicism is the only Anglican tradition.
"Ordered Estates: Anglo-Catholicism and British Immigrants in Hamilton." Journal of the Canadian Church Historical Society 42, n[degrees] 1 (Spring 2000) : 5-37.
His most recent book is Glorious Battle: The Cultural Politics of Victorian Anglo-Catholicism (Vanderbilt University Press).
Anglo-Catholicism was barely tolerated, particularly by the Nonconformists who were the bedrock of Gladstone's Liberal Party.
Anglo-Catholicism emerges as the major stumbling-block on the way, although one might give Anglo-Catholics credit for having raised awkward questions of church polity which others had sidestepped.
Eliot's religion, Anglo-Catholicism, is a higher-than-high version of Anglicanism only a footstep away from Rome, and his attachment to it seems to have derived from an odd combination of his political mood and his authentic spirituality.
But his ostensibly democratic New Critical pedagogy, which grows out of a desire to witness to the American undergraduate the unity of literary texts, is at odds with the exclusive nature of Eliot's literary tradition, especially when constructed in the service of Anglo-Catholicism. If one layers into this matrix Brooks' own conversion to Episcopalianism, then one can begin to understand the tensions and contradictions that are in play in Brooks's "community."
Paz discusses the problems the Church of England faced, especially with the rise of Anglo-Catholicism. Unable, on the one hand, to overcome Nonconformist antipathy to its establishment, the Church of England also had to cope with fears that the Tractarians were surreptitiously ushering Roman Catholicism into its midst.