Anglo-Catholicism


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Anglo-Catholicism

 

a movement within the Anglican Church for the return to Catholicism, but without merging with the Roman Catholic Church. It began on the eve of the English Bourgeois Revolution in the 17th century as an anti-Puritan movement; it reappeared in the so-called Oxford movement of the 1830’s and 1840’s. Anglo-Catholicism opposes religious modernism and state intervention in the affairs of the church. The Anglo-Catholics are the most conservative group of Anglicans, with many supporters among the English aristocracy.

References in periodicals archive ?
Press, 2008); John Shelton Reed, Glorious Battle: The Cultural Politics of Victorian Anglo-Catholicism (Vanderbilt Univ.
There was a dedication of the self which was verbalized in terms of personal attachment to the Saviour, within the disciplines of contemporary Anglo-Catholicism.
Historically constituted by three competing streams of theology and piety--Evangelicalism, Anglo-Catholicism and Modernism--the Episcopal and Canadian Anglican churches were known for sustaining uneasy alliances.
Such reflection, for me, points to an intriguing intersection between two differing strains of Christianity - Anglo-Catholicism and fundamentalism.
The terms Oxford Movement, Tractarianism, ritualism, and Anglo-Catholicism are often used interchangeably.
uenced by the Oxford Movement, which consisted of high church Anglicans, including Cardinal Newman, and developed into Anglo-Catholicism.
About a year later I began to experience some misgivings about the Catholic Church and gravitated towards Anglo-Catholicism which, at that time, was but a step removed in its teaching and practice from the Roman Church.
Killeen highlights the perception that Anglo-Catholicism was an effeminate religion where men wore dresses and displayed a lack of vigour and virility that was very 'unEnglish' (p.
Indeed, it could hardly serve as a "myth" to underpin Anglo-Catholicism.
He contends that, in its early days, Victorian Anglo-Catholicism was a countercultural movement, analogous in many ways to the counter-culture of the 1960s, a comparison he makes explicit in his witty introduction.
Eliot, who converted to Anglo-Catholicism because he believed the Anglican Church's division from Rome allowed it to maintain a universal character while functioning in a national framework.
One church - All Saints - creeping towards Anglo-Catholicism and the other - St Lawrence - pretending to be a Nonconformist chapel.