Anglo-Norman


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Anglo-Norman

History
1. relating to the Norman conquerors of England, their society, or their language
2. a Norman inhabitant of England after 1066
3. the Anglo-French language
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Anglo-Norman poem is modelled on his earlier Latin Philomena in both its form (monorhymed quatrains) and its structure (short meditative or lyrical passages on the life of Christ and the Virgin organized chronologically), and is a thorough reworking of the material for a lay audience.
The Anglo-Norman life, longer and richer than the known Latin vitae, elaborates Osith's struggle, lasting for over three years, to preserve her virginity from her pagan husband, King Sighere of the East Saxons.
At the same time the Anglo-Norman aristocracy were also active in the founding of new monasteries, and though these were rarely as well-endowed as the Anglo-Saxon communities some, like Shrewsbury or St Werburgh's, Chester, became the dominant abbeys in their regions.
Scholars have been able to draw links between this Harmony and the later medieval adaptations on which the Anglo-Norman Estoire drew.
Of these two early Anglo-Norman Psalters, the translation found in the Eadwine Psalter (Cambridge, Trinity College, MS R.17.1) most clearly illustrates the response to the precedent of Anglo-Saxon literary culture, in this case the traditions of the Old English Psalter.
Diarmuid becomes the prototypical traitor in Irish history, and the Anglo-Norman invaders become the "stranger in the house" (4).
The topics include the representation of anger in the Latin crusade accounts of the 1096 Rhineland Massacres, the destruction of Jerusalem in Anglo-Norman historiography, Jews in Austrian town charters of the 13th and 14th centuries, making the Jews in the Hours of Mary de Bohun, and complex relations between Jews and Christians in Late Medieval German and other literature.
A Courcy family history is itself a useful contribution to the historiography of Anglo-Norman aristocracy, but Flanders declares his intention to use it in order to place the conquest of Ulster in its context.
Anglo-Norman Romances or Chansons de Geste?" She analyzes the forms and affinities of Otinel, La Destruction de Rome, and the Roman de Horn to demonstrate their authors' deliberate evocation of chanson de geste.
Neil Cartlidge's "The Fairies in the Fountain: Promiscuous Liaisons," an investigation of Marie de France's Lanval alongside the Anglo-Norman fabliau Le Chevalier qui fist les consparler, provides a fitting introduction to the internal exploitations of Anglo-Norman literary culture.