Anglo-Saxon


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Anglo-Saxon

1. a member of any of the West Germanic tribes (Angles, Saxons, and Jutes) that settled in Britain from the 5th century ad and were dominant until the Norman conquest
2. the language of these tribes
References in periodicals archive ?
"An Angle on this Earth: Sense of Place in Anglo-Saxon England." Bulletin of the John Rylands University of Manchester 82:3-27.
Michelet shows how religious texts such as Bede's Ecclesiastical History persistently reposition Anglo-Saxon England in a Christian centre, in defiance of geographical marginality (Gregory's celebrated pun on 'Angles' and 'angels' includes a third term, for the Anglo-Saxons are also in mundi angulo--in a corner of the world).
Antonio Osorio, who fled Colombia and arrived in Canada in 1999 as a political refugee along with his wife, Andrea, and then-one-year-old daughter Vittoria, becoming parish priest of a white, Anglo-Saxon parish with 29 lifelong members was a baptism of fire.
Always conscious of the gaps in his own education, Alfred, with Asser's help, learned Latin, eventually becoming proficient enough to translate several books (including Gregory the Great's "Pastoral Care") into Anglo-Saxon. In an era when such skills were looked down on as within the purview only of clerics, and neglected by the majority of the nobility of the land, the king encouraged the pursuit of literacy within his court, particularly among the young.
Worries about a creeping Anglo-Saxon takeover in Basel were confirmed when Roger W.
In chapter two Damon focuses on the Anglo-Saxon alternative to Martin's pacifism--that is, the image of martyred holy-warrior kings.
Academics at University College London studied a sample of English men and found their genes were almost identical to people in an area of the Netherlands where the Anglo-Saxons are thought to have originated.
Blackwell Publishers have filled an important gap in the reference section with this first major reference work solely devoted to the interdisciplinary study of Anglo-Saxon England from circa 450 to 1066.
His enthusiasm for Anglo-Saxon history began when he was a child: his work at West Stow has made him a world authority on our Teutonic ancestors who came from Denmark, the Rhineland and Schleswig-Holstein.
Higham examines the role of Christian conversion in the political policies and dynastic intrigue of the seventh-century Anglo-Saxon kings.
Church historians aimed to chronicle the arrival and spread of Christianity in Britain, while linguists recognized the Anglo-Saxon roots of English and realized that knowledge of the Anglo-Saxon language was fundamental to a proper understanding of British heritage.
During the 1980s and 1990s there was little change in the ethnic character of SNEs: a substantial majority of SNEs involved persons of Anglo-Saxon origin, and Anglo-Saxons continued to be highly over-represented in SNEs relative to their share of the population.