ethnocentrism

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ethnocentrism,

the feeling that one's group has a mode of living, values, and patterns of adaptation that are superior to those of other groups. It is coupled with a generalized contempt for members of other groups. Ethnocentrism may manifest itself in attitudes of superiority or sometimes hostility. Violence, discrimination, proselytizing, and verbal aggressiveness are other means whereby ethnocentrism may be expressed.

ethnocentrism

  1. the attitude of prejudice or mistrust towards outsiders which may exist within a social group; a way of perceiving one's own cultural group (in-group) in relation to others (out-groups). The term was introduced by W. G. SUMNER (1906) and involves the belief that one's own group is the most important, or is culturally superior to other groups. Thus, one's own culture is considered to be racially, morally and culturally of greater value or significance than that of others, and one becomes distrustful of those defined as outsiders. It also involves an incapacity to acknowledge that cultural differentiation does not imply the inferiority of those groups who are ethnically distinct from one's own.
  2. a characteristic of certain personality types. The ethnocentric personality is described by T Adorno et al. (1950) in The Authoritarian Personality (see AUTHORITARIAN PERSONALITY). Initially this study was concerned with the social and psychological aspects of anti-Semitism, but developed into a study of its more general correlates. Adorno et al. were concerned with explaining attitudes towards other ‘out-groups’ in American society, such as homosexuals and ethnic minorities, and maintained that antagonism towards one ‘out-group’ (e.g. Jews) seldom existed in isolation. They found that ethnocentrism tended to be associated with authoritarianism, dogmatism and rigidity, political and economic conservatism, and an implicit anti-democratic ideology. Thus, hostility towards one ‘out-group’ (see IN-GROUP AND OUT-GROUP) was often generalized and projected onto other ‘out-groups’. See also PREJUDICE, DISCRIMINATION, RACISM OR RACIALISM, ATTITUDE, ATTITUDE SCALE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Marmaduke Pickthall (18751936) had the fortitude to defend the Turks in the early twentieth century and Justice Syed Ameer Ali (1849-1928), who wrote A Short History of the Saracens and The Spirit of Islam, settled with his English wife in a manor house near Newbury, dedicating his life to a literary struggle to free the British of their Anglocentrism.
Victor Treadwell, one of my history tutors, known in Oxford as "the historian's historian," contended, "Anglocentrism is the curse of English history." Romacentrism and Eurocentrism are the curse of Catholic history.
He chronicles a shift in homoerotic cartographies from the racialization and racism that dominated sexual identities during colonial and neocolonial periods to the anglocentrism of the nationalist period and early gay organizing to the multicultural globalizing present in which queer culture and space is being redefined by people of the First Nations and of south Chinese and south Asian heritages.
MacLeod hints that the idea of "postcolonial London" might be vaguely transgressive; after all, much postcolonial study has tried to loosen the grip of Anglocentrism, where London is implicitly or explicitly the political or cultural arbiter over a vast sphere of influence across the world.
Anglocentrism must not blind us to the importance of the wave of machine-breaking that took place in 1789-91.
These programs contribute to multilingualism through raising the status of community languages in Australia, challenging Anglocentrism and demonstrating to a wider audience that English is not the only possible vehicle for communication.
Pocock in 1975, who made the case for "a new subject" that might escape the Anglocentrism of "English history" and the narrow partisanship of "Irish history"--and, indeed, be more sensitive to culture and ideas than was the norm for political history in the mid-1970s.
The rise of Aboriginal history coincided with other social forces: the survival of Aboriginal peoples after their population dipped alarmingly in the early 20th century; the recognition of part-Aboriginal peoples as having an Aboriginal identity; the rise of a fairly liberal policy of multiculturalism which broke down somewhat the traditional Anglocentrism of Australian society; the flourishing of liberation movements after the 1970s; and the development of an infrastructure for funding in culture and the arts which facilitated an Aboriginal cultural renaissance.
The distaff lead of "Joe Egg," who hadn't been to New York since she was 15, has been amazed at the Anglocentrism of her category at the Tonys.
It is a long journey into the December night with a paper moon stuck to the sky, a journey I have longed to make since the time my Aunt Api used to read those fascinating Ukrainian fairytales to me back home in India when I was a child, the better to undercut the Anglocentrism of Mother Goose and my English private grammar school education.
conveyed the legal concept in a way which, having regard to the facts of the case, would have enabled the jury to grasp its true meaning.' (129) The apparent deference, of both the court of first instance and the appellate court, to Georgatsoulis's Greek culture belies any allegation of Anglocentrism. Nevertheless, in admitting evidence of Georgatsoulis's cultural background there is a disturbing inference that Greek culture, as opposed to the dominant Australian culture, is far more patriarchal and regressive in its treatment of women.
The lengthy "wondrous bout of Anglocentrism" attributed to them (and torn from its context) is nowhere to be found in the fourth edition of their book.