anharmonicity

(redirected from Anharmonic)
Also found in: Dictionary.

anharmonicity

[¦an‚här·mə′nis·əd·ē]
(physics)
Mechanical vibration where the restoring force acting on a system does not vary linearly with displacement from equilibrium position.
Variation from a linear relationship of dipole moment with internuclear distance in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many efforts have been made to derive procedures for the calculation and analysis of cumulants describing the thermodynamic properties and anharmonic effects or phonon-phonon interactions in temperature-dependent XAFS [2-28] using the classical approach [3-6] and quantum theory [7-28].
The positive and negative signs of the coefficient of the anharmonic potential give a correction to the linear potential.
The collected and experimental data are well fitted with (2) and (3) based on the anharmonic vibration theory.
Mingo, "Anharmonic phonon flow through molecular-sized junctions," Physical Review B: Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, vol.
Marty et al., "Giant anharmonic phonon scattering in PbTe," Nature Materials, vol.
3 is typical for the coupling of PL emission transition to slightly anharmonic vibration mode.
Klemens, "Anharmonic thermal resistivity of dielectric crystals at low temperatures," Physical Review B, vol.
At about 0.25 s, this anharmonic behavior is overcome by slower decay characteristics, with the latter being consistent with the simple model of damped harmonic motion.
Truman, "Feynman maps, Cameron-Martin formulae and anharmonic oscillators," Annales de l'Institut Henri Poincare.
3.1) rather than the computed anharmonic ZPEs that were used in those studies.
Throughout the text, Kazakov argues from a perspective of insight into the application of quantum theory to the physical problems that arise from the interpretation of molecular spectra, and the physics of anharmonic vibrations.
The third potential [V.sub.AH] is single-well but anharmonic, which allows us to investigate a different quantum mechanical effect other than that caused by tunnelling.