iron oxide

(redirected from Anhydrous Iron Oxide)
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iron oxide

[′ī·ərn ′äk‚sīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
Any of the hydrated, synthetic, or natural oxides of iron: ferrous oxide, ferric oxide, ferriferous oxide.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

iron oxide

A principal ingredient in a family of inorganic pigments, ranging from yellow through red and from purple to black; used extensively in paints.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

iron oxide

A combination of iron and oxygen that is found in nature and also manufactured. Iron oxide is used in pigments and coatings such as the surfaces of magnetic tapes and disks. Iron bonds to oxygen in the air and eventually becomes rust, which is also iron oxide. Iron oxide-hydroxide, also known as "ferric oxyhydroxide," is iron, oxygen and hydrogen.
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