aniline dye

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aniline dye

[′an·əl·ən ′dī]
(organic chemistry)
A dye derived from aniline.
References in periodicals archive ?
(14) The essay "The International Congress of Applied Chemistry and Aniline Dyes" appears in Coomaraswamy's book Art and Swadeshi published in 1912.
According to one scholar, the tradition of reddish tones began in the sixteenth century with the onset of cochineal dye production: hut today these brilliant tones derive from commercial aniline dyes. Tarabuco design patterns, while immensely spirited and lyrical, nonetheless seem relatively ordered and even a bit tame when compared with the visual chaos and surreal fantasy in many Jalq'a textiles.
Perkin was attempting to synthesize quinine (for use against malaria) when instead his efforts yielded the first aniline dye and artificial color to be extracted from coal-tar derivatives.
Weigert facilitated Ehrlich's research on aniline dyes and stimulated his interest in pathologic anatomy.
But by later decades wool manufacturers had discovered aniline dyes and so the violent magentas and acid greens arrived with a bang.
Some preparations of lamp oil contain aromatic hydrocarbons, or various scents and dyes, including aniline dyes that can contribute to additional toxicities (3).
Since pear mimics the properties of ebony, the wood rejected for color problems - too yellow or a faded pink - it is often dyed black with aniline dyes and used as a substitute for ebony.
You can't buy natural indigo at reasonable cost anymore--if at all--but aniline dyes come in all colors, and are stable, long-lasting, and relatively inexpensive.
A patch test should be performed before the semipermanent dye is applied, since about one fourth of the people who are allergic to permanent dyes are also allergic to aniline dyes that may be used in semipermanent dyes.
Later, aniline dyes were used and to a large extent replaced indigenous dyes.
Throughout the 19th century the English textile industry was transformed by a huge influx of mechanical printing and the use of aniline dyes. Wardle, among others, disliked the new man-made colours.
This, however, may not have been necessary, as what is Known now which wasn't Known then, is that aniline dyes, in their raw form, are carcinogenic.