Feces

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feces

[′fē·sēz]
(physiology)
The waste material eliminated by the gastrointestinal tract.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Feces

 

excrement, the contents of the lower section of the large intestine, discharged during defecation. In man and the majority of animals, feces are of solid consistency as a result of water absorption in the large intestines. Feces consist of undigested remains of food, mucoid intestinal juice, epithelial cells (which are constantly desquamating from the interior surface of the intestinal tract), and microorganisms of the intestinal flora (mainly Escherichia coli). Testing of feces has diagnostic value: blood and pus (when ulcers or hemorrhoids are present), worms and their ova, and the causative agents of dysentery, typhoid fever, or cholera may be found.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Feces

(dreams)
Dreams containing feces may be odd but they are not uncommon. Feces represent those things that you no longer need, things that are currently garbage or waste and need to be discarded. This dream may represent healthy psychological progress. It may indicate that you are cleansing yourself of unnecessary and possibly hurtful attitudes, ideas, and emotions. At times, and depending on the details of the dream, feces could represent a contaminated area of your life, mind, or spirit. Look at the details and consider if the image of feces is in regard to something that you have been trying to clean or if it brings up stress provoking thoughts, confusion, and difficult and unresolved areas of your life. In some cultures people believe that if you are dreaming about feces you will soon prosper financially. (Feces in the dream mean money in the hand.)
Bedside Dream Dictionary by Silvana Amar Copyright © 2007 by Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arrangements have been made at three sites for disposal of animal waste. These sites are Lakhoder Dumpsite, Mehmood Booti Dumpsite and Saggian Dumpsite' he concluded.
Director of the Veterinary Office of BiH Ljubomir Kalaba said that is it task of all competent bodies in BiH to secure firstly disposal of first category animal waste, very dangerous waste and category two, dead animal, which needs to be financed by the state.
Although Anaerobic Digestion plants are in use on farms elsewhere in Europe, none of these plants have been designed to deal with the problems associated with processing animal waste."
Environmental pollution from animal waste (faeces, urine, and respiration and fermentation gases) is a global concern and is much more acute and serious in countries with high concentrations of animals on a limited land base for manure disposal.
DeWolf said concern about animal waste is just as important as the content of household products and their effects on the environment.
"The idea of using animal waste to generate energy has been around for centuries, with manure being used every day in remote villages to generate heat for cooking," says Tom Christian, principal research scientist in HP's Sustainable IT Ecosystem Lab.
The Scottish government hope the project at Jamie's farm in Dunbar, East Lothian, will pave the way for other farms to transform animal waste into green energy.
Coliforms contaminate water supplies through flood, sewage and animal waste matter.
The report said that more than half of all groundwater sources here were contaminated by human or animal waste. Ms Tuffy added: "Many of the problems identified in today's report have been caused by the fact that development in some areas outpaced any increase in the capacity of local waste water treatment systems."
AIDAN O'BRIEN has told a hearing into plans to build a new animal waste treatment plant close to Ballydoyle stables that he had seen "grown men get physically sick from the smell" produced from a plant that had previously occupied the site, writes Jon Lees.
At the time great concern was voiced over the possibility of having to leave rotting animal waste in bins for so long, particularly in warm weather, and the spectre of increased vermin population was foremost in the minds of those who protested.