Aniui

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Aniui

 

a river in the northeastern USSR, right tributary of the Kolyma River. It is formed by the merging of the Bol’shoi Aniui and Malyi Aniui, which flow out of the Anadyr’ plateau. The length of the Aniui proper is 8 km; the length of the Bol’shoi Aniui is 693 km, and the length of the Malyi Aniui is 738 km. The area of the basin is 107,000 sq km, which includes 57,200 sq km of the basin of the Bol’shoi Aniui and 49,800 sq km of the basin of the Malyi Aniui. The Aniui is fed by meltwater and rainwater. High-water time is in May and June. In the summer there are freshets caused by rainfall. The river is icebound about nine months of the year. The Aniui system is used for navigation, floating logs, fishing, and supplying the mining industry with water.


Aniui

 

(also Oniui, or Dondon), a river in Khabarovsk Krai, RSFSR; right tributary of the Amur. Rises on the slopes of the Sikhote-Alin’ Range. Length, 393 km; basin area, 12,700 sq km. In its upper course the Aniui is a mountain river; in its lower course it is a plains river and flows through a wide valley with low-lying, swampy shores. Near the mouth it breaks into a number of branches, channels, and oxbow lakes. There are many shoals, spits, and rocky rapids in the riverbed. The Aniui is fed by summer and autumn rains. The highest water level occurs in August. Its main tributary is the Manoma River (right).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.