Annales school


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Annales school

the group of sociologically inclined French historians associated with the journal Annales d'histoire économique et sociale, founded in 1929 by Lucien Febvre and Marc BLOCH. Its links with Marxism have been particularly strong, as have its links with sociology Distinguished by their opposition to traditional, national, political, chronological and narrative history members of the school have in particular emphasized the importance of social and economic history and longterm historical trends. As well as breaking with conventional units and methods of analysis in historical studies, the approaches employed included extensive consideration of geophysical and demographic factors as well as cultural and social structural factors. An example of the work of members of the school is Blochs Feudal Society, which combines comparative analysis and great novelty with scrupulous attention to detail. More recently the work of Fernand BRAUDEL, with its emphasis on writing all-embracing ‘global history’, has been especially influential within the social sciences, e.g. on the work of Immanuel WALLERSTEIN on the WORLD SYSTEM. See also HISTORY OF MENTALITIES.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 1930s and 1940s, Lucien Febvre, a member of the Annales School, called for histories of love, joy, and cruelty, arguing that modern conceptions of these emotions had little to do with their meaning or expression in other times.
An examination of contacts between the Sublime Porte and the Muslim Lands Below the Winds illustrates this 'new "configuration of history" 'that comes out of emerging fields of academic inquiry, such as Indian Ocean Studies, applying a research template inspired by the now classical work of Annales School historian Fernand Braudel on the maritime expanse encompassing the Mediterranean World and the Atlantic.
Such accounts by professional historiographic historians typically attributed this "new" field to the convergence of history and cultural anthropological studies, and reference the late French Annales School, feminist theory, postcolonial studies and French post-structuralism as key influences, all occurring since the end of the Second World War.
It has been hypothesized that the celebrated geographer and anarchist Elisee Reclus was a decisive influence on several concepts that are characteristic of the Annales School, the historical French school of the Annales d'histoire economique et sociale, such as longue duree, material history, space-movement, and geohistory.
Although there were earlier precedents in the work of Norbert Elias and members of the Annales school, the rise of social and cultural history has led to a distinct uptick in the practice of emotions history since the 1980s.
The first section of the volume explores different modern and postmodern theoretical approaches to history and includes chapters on the implications of empiricism for history, the French Annales school, intellectual history, social history, the literary turn in the work of Hayden White, Derridean deconstruction, rhetoric and history, Foucault and the unconscious of history and culture, narrative theory, and the boundaries of history and fiction.
Instead, the interactions of civilizations are presented true to the Annales School of historiography.
But his exposure to the Annales school, Le Goff and Duby's ethnohistoire, and Bourdieu's micro-history, structuralism, and post-structuralism, pushed Arkoun towards a "vision of critical history as an all-embracing discipline among the social sciences" (p.
Christian defines Big History as an examination of the past employing all currently known timescales; an approach that extends the Annales school longue duree to a logical conclusion: the greatest extent possible.
In the second half of the twentieth century the Annales school has been typified by the work of Fernand Braudel writing on the history of the Mediterranean and the work of Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie on medieval France.
Even economic history, dominated as it is in Ireland by famines and colonial-style expropriations, is far from yielding the serene longue duree trends that the Annales school was trying to salvage from the sound and fury of evenemential political history.