Annigoni


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Annigoni

Pietro ('pjE:tro). 1910--88, Italian painter; noted esp for his portraits of President Kennedy (1961) and Queen Elizabeth II (1955 and 1970)
References in periodicals archive ?
STORY OF A REIGN J Stamps show royal portraits by, from left, Annigoni (1955), Stone (1992), Pavlenko (2000), Royal Mail's Phillips (2012) and Festing (1999) STO J
We acknowledge the staff of the pediatric unit, the nutritional recuperation center for mothers and children, and the laboratory units of the Saint Camille Medical Center and the Biomolecular Research Center Pietro Annigoni of Ouagadougou for their cooperation.
The princess 33 sittings with Annigoni began in 1956, a year after the princess called off her plans to marry divorced Group Captain Peter Townsend.
We have been given a signal privilege, but would be still more thankful if the exhibition had included the self-portraits of Holbein, Cranach, Quentin de la Tour, Ingres and Corot (all present in the Uffizi) rather than those of sixteen Italian painters since 1700 who, with the exception of Annigoni, are neither well known nor much admired outside their own country.
The Queen Mother owned what she described as the best picture of Prince Philip - a 1956 study by Italian Pietro Annigoni.
Additional Reading:Pliny, Baldinucci, Goya, Ruskin, Degas, Berenson, Epstein, Gombrich, and Annigoni all said cogent things against art restoration practices.
Then he answered an advertisement and found himself working for a Canadian selling prints by Annigoni, the Italian artist famous for a controversial 1950s portrait of the Queen.
5) While this ironclad rule regarding peremptory remedies seems at odds with the introduction of scrutiny to the exercise of the peremptory right, this Case Note will argue that Annigoni can best be understood as part of a broader convergence between the jurisprudence of peremptory challenges and selective prosecutions.
Such a change in the social functions of painting has not made painting obsolete, not even the realistic paintings of Annigoni, which do not fulfill the function of portraying a person but of celebrating an important person, so that the commissioning, the purchasing and the exhibition of such portraits acquire aristocratic connotations.
In late 1961, for example, the magazine flew Italian portraitist Pietro Annigoni from Europe to Washington, D.