anomic suicide


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anomic suicide

the form of SUICIDE associated with ANOMIE, i.e. with serious disruptions of the social order, such as an unexpected catastrophe or rapid economic growth, or with any similar disturbances in social expectations. Anomic suicide is the third of the three main types of SUICIDE identified by DURKHEIM (Suicide, 1897).
References in periodicals archive ?
Anomic Suicide: This is the result of sudden upsurge in socio-economic conditions that results social imparity in identity, values and culture.
Integration and regulation generate the causes of four different social types of suicide: egotistical suicide, stemming from weak integration; altruistic suicide, stemming from excessive integration; anomic suicide stemming from weak regulation (Durkheim [1897] 2006: 325); and finally, the undertheorized fatalistic suicide, stemming from excessive regulation, "committed by those whose future is pitilessly confined," blocking personally fulfilling and socially beneficial life paths (Durkheim [1897] 2006: 305; Pearce 2001: 121-123).
He thus defines four types of suicide, such as egoistic suicide, altruistic suicide, anomic suicide and fatalist suicide.
* Anomic suicide characterizes modern societies, where economic, political, religious, and, ultimately, moral imbalance favours the propensity to autolysis.
Suicidal behavior is also common in societies where there is a low degree of social regulation (leading to anomic suicide).
(2,4,8,15,16,24) All 3 Durkheimian types of suicides occur in the elderly--a sense of isolation leads to "egoistic suicide", social deregulation and normlessness predispose to "anomic suicide", and some seniors eliminate themselves to 'unburden' their family (the "altruistic type").
(14) On the second scale, that of moral regulation, lays the other two forms of suicide, the first of which is anomic suicide, located on the low end.